49

I asked Mr Gaiman on Twitter to respond, and he did, as well as another person: Aliza "I think and I vote." (@alizatw): To summarize: it's reported but not authoritatively confirmed that @neilhimself and @terryandrob did a radio interview with someone who thought they were religious zealots and #GoodOmens was talking about the real Armageddon. ...


27

Seems to be referring to Wu Daozi (680 – c. 760, a Chinese painter of the Tang dynasty), as depicted in the following text: Wu's death was a myth. One story says that after painting a mural about a natural scene in the palace one day, Wu drew a door on the mural in the side of a hill. Then he clapped his hands and the door opened. After entering, Wu ...


22

As identified in the answer by HeyJude, this could be the story of the disappearance of Tang dynasty painter Wu Daozi (吴道子; variously transliterated as Wu Tao-tsz’, Wu Tao-Tsu, or Go Doshi). The earliest version of this story to appear in English was that of art collector William Anderson (1842–1900): The legend, which celebrates the disappearance of the ...


16

My guess: "Can I Get You a Glass of Water? or, Please Close the Glottis after You" by Ogden Nash. which I found on pp. 34-35 of an old hardcover Ogden Nash collection titled You Can't Get There From Here. It's probably the wrong answer, because it's about coughing rather than hiccups and features the word glottis rather than epiglottis. I'm posting ...


15

The key phrase is “blue like an orange”. This is from a poem by French surrealist Paul Éluard, published in L'Amour la poésie. The poem is somewhat well known in France, and has been analyzed by many, but I've never read it. It may be less well-known in English, although “blue like an orange” does seem to be a somewhat well-known phrase in English as well. ...


14

This an adaptation of a poem by Paul Éluard. I’ve bolded the elements that appear in the limerick. La terre est bleue comme une orange Jamais une erreur les mots ne mentent pas Ils ne vous donnent plus à chanter Au tour des baisers de s’entendre Les fous et les amours Elle sa bouche d’alliance Tous les secrets tous les sourires Et quels vêtements d’...


14

"Miss Hinch", by Henry Sydnor Harrison as per this Goodreads discussion: The story takes place on a train. A little old lady is talking to a clergyman about various crimes attributed to Miss Hinch .... It turns out that the little old lady is a famous private detective named Jessie Dark and the clergyman is Miss Hinch in disguise. Miss Hinch ...


14

This is Lee Child's Killing Floor, the first published Jack Reacher book. Jack Reacher gets off a Greyhound bus in the town of Margrave, Georgia, because he remembers his brother mentioning that a blues musician named Blind Blake had died there. Much to his surprise, shortly after his arrival, he is arrested in a local diner for murder on the orders of the ...


14

You're probably thinking of (and slightly misremembering) "Once Upon a Time" by Nadine Gordimer. Points that match: story around two pages long paranoid parents child killed in barbed wire Points that don't match: the child seems to be older than a "baby" the parents aren't necessarily afraid of someone harming their child, just ...


12

This is The Select by F. Paul Wilson. See Wikipedia (which has a very brief description) and Goodreads, from which I quote the description and some of the reviews as follows, with emphasis added by me. (All typos are [sic] - I copy-pasted this rather than transcribing by hand.) Quinn Cleary has always wanted to be a doctor. Yet the only way she can afford ...


12

‘The Raw Shark Texts’ by Steven Hall seems to mesh with your description, the Wikipedia plot summary states: The plot of Jaws is referenced extensively and fully acknowledged by the characters in the book, who view it through the device of the conceptual becoming real. The climax of the novel follows the events in the film in detail, highlighting the sense ...


11

After spending way too much time on this, I finally found it! Welcom be ye whan ye go, And farewell whan ye come; So faire as ye there be no mo As brighte as bery broune. I love you verrily at my to, Nonne so moche in all this toune; I am right glad when ye will go, And sory when ye will come. And whan ye be other fare, I pray for you sertaine, That never ...


10

Throne of Glass, by Sarah J. Maas Quotes are from the Fandom wiki's plot summary/synopsis, and are [sic] as I copy-pasted. Name glossary for the below, because YA names are weird: Celaena Sardothien is the main character Prince Dorian Havilliard is the prince Captain Chaol Westfall is the captain of the guard Cain is the massive guy The main character is a ...


10

The Secrets of Life and Death by Rebecca Alexander seems a probable match. From the Penguin Randomhouse website: ABOUT THE SECRETS OF LIFE AND DEATH In modern day England, Professor Felix Guichard is called in to identify occult symbols found on the corpse of a young girl. His investigation brings him in contact with a mysterious woman, Jackdaw Hammond, who ...


10

This is probably the short story "The Usual Santas" by Mick Herron, published in the collection The Usual Santas in 2017, and adapted for the Wall Street Journal as Santa #9: A Christmas Short Story, from which the quotes below are taken as I couldn't find a copy of the book. Eight men work as Santas in the same shopping mall, called Whiteoaks: ...


9

After much, much, much searching I finally found the answer: "Come Again! The Second Greatest Story Ever Told" by Ed Jones. From the summary on Goodreads it looks like I mis-remembered quite a few key details but I am 100% certain this is the right book because I recognise the cover image (actually a grumpy looking cherub, not the creation of Adam, ...


9

This sounds like The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius. It was written in 523 AD. Wikipedia tells us the following about the circumstances of the work's composition: The Consolation of Philosophy was written in AD 523 during a one-year imprisonment Boethius served while awaiting trial—and eventual execution—for the alleged crime of treason under the ...


9

You are looking for The Dollmaker by Harriette Simpson Arnow. The story is set in the 1920s "First published in 1954, the novel earned a 1955 nomination for the National Book Award." concerns the difficulties of rural Appalachians trying to adapt to life as factory workers in the urban slums of Chicago "In a 1983 interview, Arnow said she ...


8

This matches in almost every detail ‘The Lost Sanjak’ by Saki, published in Reginald in Russia and Other Sketches (1910). “a man (a journalist?) visiting a prison inmate” The prison Chaplain entered the condemned’s cell for the last time, to give such consolation as he might. “He was incarcerated for a crime he did not commit” “In ten minutes’ time I ...


8

"Sweets from a Stranger", a short story by Nicholas Fisk, reprinted in the 1993 anthology Tales of Horror and Mystery which can be borrowed from the Internet Archive. You said you read it in an anthology of stories by different authors, with a title something like Tales of Mystery and Horror, and that it included Roald Dahl's story "The Hitch-...


8

This is A Transit Rife With Perils by Gary Krist: O’Hare! O’Hare! The word was like a dagger to his heart, For everyone who traveled knew that name: A Lotus-eaters’ land, where men flew in But ne’er came out again, A god-forsaken place that, Circe-like, Turned even patient men to savage beasts.


8

I think this is "The Cave of Ali Baba" or "The Adventurous Exploit of the Cave of Ali Baba", by Dorothy L. Sayers. It was a bit longer than an average short story IIRC - maybe a "novelette" or "novella", and was the final story in the collection "Lord Peter Views the Body" A man is a spy in a secret illegal ...


8

The book is most likely The Adventures of Ali Baba Bernstein by Johanna Hurwitz (and with illustrations by Gail Owens), published by HarperCollins in 1995. Below is the "evidence" (from the preview on Amazon.com, which gives access to most of the first chapter): "get extra credit at school for reading a very long book": David Bernstein ...


7

I found it! Ottoline and the Yellow Cat by Chris Riddell I'm so glad I did, I've been looking for it for ages. The book was published in 2007 in the UK, originally in English. Wikipedia article hits the points pretty well. Her parents are away travelling. Ottoline's parents go on trips to other countries, leaving Mr Munroe to care for her. [...] They have ...


7

The Forgetting by Sharon Cameron The title is about the expected length and the glowing tree is indeed on the cover of this book. There was actually a series, not just a single other sequel. The following are from the book. Typos are probably my fault. When I didn’t quote to back something up, it’s because the information was scattered about and it would ...


7

This newer parody version appears to have an anonymous author. I found the full poem here and here, so at least you can read it in full: "You are old, Father William," the young man said, "And your nose has a look of surprise; Your eyes have turned round to the back of your head, And you live upon cucumber pies." "I know it, I know ...


7

That would be James Baldwin's own publication Easy Rider, which can be found in WorldCat. The notes in the WorldCat entry describe this publication as follows: "A selection from James Baldwin's forthcoming novel, Another country." --Cover. In The Dial: an annual of fiction. New York, 1962. p. 3-26.


6

Are you sure it's by Roald Dahl? That description makes it sound oddly like "They Never Get Caught", but that's by Margery Allingham and is from 1936. Harold Brownrigg, the villain of the piece, is a chemist and has the strange habit of lying down on his couch every Saturday evening and drinking brandy until he literally cannot move (not because ...


6

You're looking for The Chaos Code by Justin Richards from 2007 about a kid who discovers his archaeologist dad is missing and tries to stop a villain from using an ancient code. Everything you mentioned (Atlantis, the disc, controlling the Elements, candle flames listening in, the golems etc.) is in there.


6

This is very reminiscent of a passage in the middle of Chapter V of Bel-Ami (admittedly a short novel, rather than a short story). This can be found on page 182 in the version of “La Bibliotheque Électronique du Quebec” which is available online. Et Duroy, pour la première fois, songea à tout ce qu’il ne savait point dans la vie passée de cettefemme, et il ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible