18

Vowels in Hebrew - called n'kudot - are written as dots and lines surrounding the letters. In an actual Torah - written on parchment - these symbols aren't there. As an example, here's a picture of a book called a "tikkun", which is used to help learn the chanting for the traditional way to read the Torah: On the right side is text with ...


17

As other answers have mentioned, what is meant is simply what is said: many renderings of the Torah leave out the vowel markers (and punctuation). As several comments have offered, this is a common feature of a lot of Hebrew text, and more broadly, is found in quite a few languages (off the top of my head, I believe Arabic is also often written this way, and ...


6

Todd Hasak-Lowy According to Dror Mishani's own website: – 11 / 2016: “The Man who wanted to know everything” out in the US – and is on PW’s books of the week list with a starred review! The third Avraham novel, “The Man who wanted to know everything”, is published today in the US (HarperCollins; translated from Hebrew by Todd Hasak-Lowy) – and is on PW’s ...


3

There's a small but crucial error in your translation. Correcting it will help us reconcile these lines with the whole song: תגידי, איך כותבים שירים עם אלף ציפיות Say (feminine second person), how do you write songs with a thousand expectations Throughout the song, Ben-Ari speaks about the challenges of relationships (with himself, his wife, children, fans)...


3

Your example is only part of the sentence spoken by the narrator and lacks the context and the first verse: The context is when at sea, the narrator has seen a creature so horrible that the sight of it leaves those who see it disturbed for ever. In the first verse the narrator asks the rhetorical question “Do people help each other?” He does not answer ...


2

This is both wordplay on the word "yisa" (travel / bear) and a reference to the people becoming sick as a result of ignoring COVID-19 restrictions. מי יחנה ומי יסע Who will stay and who will travel As we should know by now, traveling and meeting with people is heavily discouraged in the middle of a pandemic; meeting with people can get them sick, ...


2

The central theme of the song is being alone. This is illustrated with the lines "no one in the city or field", "no one to interact with", even in that first stanza. A little further on, in the chorus there are the lines "ולא להיות לבד" ("and not to be alone") and "ואיך נדע להתאחד בפרוד הזה" ("and know ...


1

In this opinion piece, Philologos writes: The original words of Stanza 2 of “Hatikvah” were: “Od lo avda tikvateynu, / hativka ha-noshana, / lashuv le-eretz avoteynu, / le’ir ba David, David ḥana” — “We still have not lost our hope, / our ancient hope, / to return to the land of our fathers, / to the city in which David, in which David encamped.” ...


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