8

To quote Wikipedia: Lovecraftian horror is a subgenre of horror fiction that emphasizes the cosmic horror of the unknown (and in some cases, unknowable) more than gore or other elements of shock, though these may still be present and The hallmark of Lovecraft's work is cosmicism: the sense that ordinary life is a thin shell over a reality that is so ...


8

Not in the mythos as Lovecraft conceived it It is hard to prove a negative: there is no categorical statement in Lovecraft's oeuvre that definitively rejects the Abrahamic God. Even if there was, since it is fiction the writer would be free to change their mind from tale to tale as it suited. Nevertheless, we can say with some certainty that it was not ...


7

Think about how we normally think about cats and dogs. Dogs, we think of as loyal, always there - man's best friend. We throw the ball, they run to fetch. We call, they come. We ask, they do. The dog gives - does what we ask, gives their service. Think of the people we describe as a dog - people who prostrate themselves before another, begging to continue ...


6

It's a literary device, leveraging the reader's imagination to increase the horror. Many of the most effective horror stories work by leveraging the reader's imagination rather than describing horrific things directly. Detailed descriptions (or images, in a film/TV context) of gore often don't work as well as more subtle creeping horror. The Blair Witch ...


6

Two phones connected by wires - it's hard to say much more than that. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Lovecraft turned this nightmare into one of his short stories, "The Statement of Randolph Carter". If you read this story (the full text is available at the link I provided), you can see that it's almost the same as the story he told in his letter to Derleth, but ...


5

This is about subject-verb agreement: when the subject is singular, so should the main verb be; when the subject is plural, then the verb should be in plural form. (Of course, this only applies to languages where verbs are conjugated and not, for example, Standard Chinese.) This rule is easy to follow when subject and verb aren't separated by many words, ...


5

The English text says that the protagonist lives in a room whose one window opened […] on to a dim court […]. From that casement one might see only walls and windows, except sometimes when one leaned so far out and peered at the small stars that passed. [… He] used night after night to lean out and peer aloft In other words, because his only window ...


4

Colin Wilson's book The Strength to Dream: Literature and the Imagination (which you found) has an entire chapter entitled "The Assault on Rationality", in which Lovecraft features prominently as one of the authors discussed. Wilson takes a very dim view of Lovecraft and his writing (and I quote: "it must be admitted that Lovecraft is a very ...


4

The protagonist here is saying that he cannot prove that the reality that he has used to - his normal life - is more real than this other reality of the marble city. He says "...for by what means can I prove the greater reality of that other life in the house of stone and brick...",meaning that he cannot prove that this marble city is less real than "......


4

It might be clearer if you reorganise the passage a little. The dog gives "meaningless affection, aimless companionship, and flattering attention and subservience". The cat is "[an] objective sight of poignant, ethereal beauty and the animate symbolisation of Nature's bland, relentless, reposeful, unhurried, and impersonal order and sufficiency".


4

To start getting involved, I would read the original author's works before moving onto anyone else. The Complete Works of H.P. Lovecraft frequently appears as a free download for Kindle. If you prefer the printed word, it is available in paperback. The stories appear in the anthology in an order that is not the chronological published order. However, ...


3

Most of the authors you list belong to a genre known as Weird Fiction. The Wikipedia article on the genre has four out of the five authors you name under its list of notable contributors and names Poe as the founder of the genre. The missing author is Guy de Maupassant. But given that he has a two-volume collection available entitled "Collected Supernatural ...


1

Laconic: using or involving the use of a minimum of words : concise to the point of seeming rude or mysterious So basically, it's indicating this piece doesn't require a lot of words to express itself. "Laconic" also tends to imply that this terseness is intentional.


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