19

TL;DR: It’s a typographical error: for “ideas” read “ideals”! “Ideals!” said my uncle; “certainly Ideals. Of course one must have ideals, else life would be bare materialism. Bare fact alone, naked necessity, is impossible barren rock for a soul to root upon. Life, indeed, is an unfurnished house, an empty glass in a thirsty land good and necessary for ...


13

He's not necessarily suggesting there's anything special about it being in season for 8 days. The sentence that you quote is part of the time traveller describing day-to-day life in the world of the distant future, what the Eloi wear and how they eat. Since they're eating fruit, one would expect their diet to vary quite a bit depending on the seasons, so his ...


8

The ten o'clock and the four o'clock are presumably referring to two different events. The first event occurred at ten o'clock when the Time Traveller used the machine for the first time. As described in the paragraph cited in the question, that was just a brief journey where at first he wasn't even sure that he had travelled at all. When he saw the clock ...


6

You should parse this as bankruptcy under the old dispensation and judicious matrimony were added to business "push". Judicious matrimony probably means he married somebody with lots of money — i.e., somebody he chose "judiciously" (even though by the dictionary definition, choosing her "judiciously" doesn't mean that he chose her because of her money; ...


6

The Invisible Man does contain some chronological inconsistencies. From the opening paragraphs of the article "A Tissue of Moonshine: the Mechanics of Deception in The Sea Lady" by B.D. Sommerville: Many of H.G. Wells’s early scientific romances and fantasies contain internal chronological, spatial or factual contradictions. There is, for example, ...


6

These are references to the condition of homelessness. THE KEY OF THE STREET IT is commonly asserted, and as commonly believed, that there are seventy thousand persons in London who rise every morning without the slightest knowledge as to where they shall lay their heads at night. However the number may be over or understated, it is very certain that a vast ...


5

The key to extracting the true meaning of this sentence is the word "demi-john", which means a large bottle commonly used for alcohol: Given this context, it seems that the "liberal heathen deity" is the ancient Graeco-Roman god Dionysus or Bacchus, the god of wine and winemaking, often associated even in much later centuries with ...


5

On February 15, 1882, the Dunedin finally set sail for Britain. She was loaded with 4,331 mutton, 598 lamb and 22 pig carcasses, 250 kegs of butter, hare, pheasant, turkey, chicken and 2,226 sheep tongues. Source: How New Zealand lamb conquered Britain in the 19th century, by Andrew Forgrave, North Wales Live, 30 December 2015. Within five years, 172 ...


4

It's impossible to answer a question like this with a definitive no, and it's an interesting notion, but it seems unlikely. For starters, Lovecraft was never shy of naming his inspirations. "It is safe to say that Blackwood is the greatest living weirdist despite unevenness and a poor prose style." - letter to Willis Conover, 10 January 1937 "I ...


3

The implication seems to be that humans are not as different from the grotesque Beast Folk as we would like to think. Most good works of speculative fiction are really saying something about the real world. Whether there's a very clear real-world analogy, or something that every political party could interpret as a reference to its opponents, the most ...


3

Not a native either but I'll hazard a guess. he wanted to say he had a sixpenny- ha'penny longcloth to sell, he put it thus to startled customers: "Can DO you one, six half if y' like." So, he had some item that cost 6.5 pence (sixpenny-halfpenny). He used "DO" (capitals probably imply some specific intonation, stress) instead of "sell" and "six half"...


2

War of the words: HG Wells coin also features false quote The new coin is inscribed: ‘Good books are warehouses of ideas’ – but digging reveals the quote to be both wrong and expressing a different sentiment Source : The Guardian It looks like the Royal mint might have messed up somewhat in choosing an applicable quote ! Author Eleanor Fitzsimons solved ...


2

In a nutshell, "subject races" means people of colour who were subjects of the British Empire. Wells uses the term ironically. There is a passage near the beginning of Chapter 4 that makes this clear: Instead of the sturdy establishment in prejudice of Bert's grandfather, to whom the word “Frenchified” was the ultimate term of contempt, there flowed ...


2

The Hurons are a native American nation. In context, it seems that Kipps and his friends have been accustomed to play at being Hurons: He set himself to whistle a peculiarly penetrating arrangement of three notes supposed by the boys of the Hastings Academy and himself and Sid Pornick, for no earthly reason whatever, to be the original Huron war-cry. We ...


2

In answering this question, I cannot do better than to quote the analysis of David Lake: I will now prove that ‘Jules’ must be taken as Wells, and no-one else. There are at least nine points of contact, including a genuine semi-quotation from a book by Wells placed in Jules’s mouth. I will first demonstrate the similarities, and only later point out how ...


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