6

A Google search for the term reveals that it means the same thing as "buck teeth", large front teeth. In French, buck teeth are called dents à l'anglaise, literally "English teeth." Also here: dents à l'anglaise Dents longues et proéminentes It's apparently not in current usage.


5

The ‘which’ and ‘where’ parts of the question were answered by Maupassant’s biographer Francis Steegmuller: A smart American publisher and bookseller named M. Walter Dunne, whose specialty was large and showily produced “sets,” felt that the time had come to confront the American public with all of Maupassant; and he issued [starting in 1903], in seventeen ...


5

The article mentioned in the original version of the question is not "Boule de Suif" (which is a novella) but the article "Les Soirées de Médan" that Maupassant published in the newspaper Le Gaulois on 27 April 1880. At the time, de Maupassant was still unknown as an author. The "soirées" he talks about are evenings that several authors spent at the house ...


3

It was almost certainly the orphan who killed his adoptive mother. Why did he do it? For her assets, for his inheritance. The question then arises why did it even occur to him to murder the woman who raised him, cared for him, bought him the books he enjoyed studying, and who loved him? Because he was evil. It is probable that Guy de Maupassant expected ...


2

"Legion of Honor": initially a very high honor created by Napoleon Bonaparte, but can be gifted to civilians and as such tends to designate an old, respectable Frenchman who has done service to his country. Source "General Council": now called the Departmental council, this is the department-level government. Essentially, what this says ...


2

Something got lost in translation here. The word “girls” gives the wrong impression. The French original (from “Une Soirée”) is “demoiselles”, which can refer to any unmarried woman. Read the scene again, but substitute “ladies” for “girls”. Varajou asks the waiter where to have fun, and the waiter's idea of having fun is to sit there and have a drink. ...


2

The mixed commissions were kangaroo courts set up by the régime of Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte after the coup of 1851 to punish suspected Republican sympathisers. The name “mixed” refers to their being composed of both civilian and military judges. La manque d’armes et de munitions, joint à la terreur imprimée dans la masse par les exéctions sommaires, obligea ...


2

The famous Littré dictionary (four volumes, 1880s) provides the following definition of souteneur: 2 Particulièrement, celui qui se fait le champion d'une maison de jeu ou de quelque mauvais lieu. Un souteneur de filles. Free translation: Particularly, someone who acts as the champion/defender of a gambling house or some house of ill repute. A ...


2

According to the Wiktionnaire: Le souteneur Celui qui, vivant du gain d’une prostituée, prétend assurer, en retour, sa protection. Le proxénète Personne qui tire profit de la prostitution d’autrui ou bien la favorise." Le souteneur: gives protection for money. Le proxénète: just looks for profit. La Celestina is a good example of this.


2

There appears to be evidence that Maupassant and Richepin met each other. A contemporary author, Octave Mirbeau (1848 – 1917), wrote in a letter to the sculptor Auguste Rodin dating from December 1885 (see Google Books): Le diner des Bons Cosaques est fixé au vendredi 8 janvier. Il aura lieu au Restaurant du Pied de Mouton, 29 rue Vauvilliers. Mirbeau ...


1

He mentioned it in La Vie Errante (The Wandering Life), published 1890. I found a quote in this blog post, both in French and in Amanda Crawley Jackson's English translation: J’ai quitté Paris et même la France, parce que la tour Eiffel finissait par m’ennuyer trop. Non seulement on la voyait de partout, mais on la trouvait partout, faite de toutes les ...


1

The original French of this fragment can also be found on Gutenberg and goes as follows: Il se chargea d'écrire l'article du Gaulois et d'accord avec ses amis, il le rédigea dans les termes que l'on sait, brodant et enjolivant, cédant sans violence à un goût naturel pour une mystification qu'innocentait sa jeunesse. L'essentiel, disait-il, est de ...


1

The story is set during the winter of 1870-1871, several months after the fall of Napoléon III's Second Empire (early September 1870) but before the preliminary peace treaty signed in Versailles on 26 February 1871. Since the Prussian forces entered Rouen in December 1870 (apparently, Prussian soldiers even used Flaubert's bed), the siege of Paris (19 ...


1

I’m not sure, but here’s a guess. If we look at the original, we see that the judge is referred to as “le premier président de Mortemain,” Mais Padoie, saisi soudain d’une colère folle, balbutia: —Où … où … où nous sommes.... Malheureux … misérable … infâme.... Où nous sommes … Chez monsieur le premier président!… chez monsieur le premier ...


1

I don't believe that it was him who killed her. I think that it was the two relatives. How did they kill her? They had a lot of time to do so. They used knife. (As given in the story) Why did they kill her? Few reasons I believe it was the relatives and not the orphan who killed Madam Source are: They wanted Madam's wealth from the beginning. ...


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