16

Definitely read To Kill a Mockingbird first. Although Go Set a Watchman reads more as a first draft of To Kill a Mockingbird, without reading Mockingbird, much of the bigotry Atticus displays in Watchman will not be unusual. In Mockingbird, Atticus is portrayed as a hero defending the underprivileged blacks, and in Watchman, that illusion of him is ...


15

If one would believe Joe Nocera, former op-ed columnist for The New York Times: No. In an article titled The Harper Lee ‘Go Set a Watchman’ Fraud (July 24, 2015 - the book was published on July 14, 2015), Nocera claims that this is a money grab from Lee's current protector, Tonja Carter. Harper Lee: The Sadness of a Sequel (February 3, 2015) in The ...


8

Aside from the debate over whether Atticus had a progressive view on race that Hamlet raised, the answer is no because they are two different Atticus Finches. In this answer, it is pointed out that Lee focused more on social tension in To Kill A Mockingbird than in Go Set A Watchman and therefore it is clear that the purpose of the novels is different. Also, ...


5

There are a few 'blatant' differences that are obvious when reading both the books. Most of these aren't that difficult to spot once you read both the books. The blatant differences: Firstly, Atticus has changed. In "Mockingbird," Atticus Finch, Scout and Jem's father, is an honorable lawyer and perhaps better father who somberly defends African-American ...


5

In general, I guess first drafts make great prequels, and should definitely be read afterwards. Think of The Hobbit, a lighter, less tense éclairage on The Lord of the Rings, which irony can only be perceived if Tolkien's masterpiece was read beforehand. Go Set a Watchman does not escape this: the social tension that makes the book interesting can escape a ...


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