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It means a minor under the guardianship of the Court of Chancery. This was a real concept in those days - indeed it still is, but such children are nowadays more often referred to as "wards of court". Most of the search engine results I found for "ward in chancery" are genealogy forum threads where people were asking about their own ...


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I don't think your missing the joke, I believe that Gilbert emphasized the "riches" rather than the "rank" when choosing her two engaged, However I can address your points of concern. Firstly in response to your third theory, the term "earl" does not appear in any of the songs in Iolanthe, so that I can definitely debunk. Secondly I can address your first ...


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According to Wiktionary, the wife of an earl is indeed a countess, as is a woman who holds an earldom in her own right. We just never came up with "earless", which certainly doesn't look right on a page. So, for example, the wife of Edward Stanley, 19th Earl of Derby is Caroline Emma Stanley (Neville), Countess of Derby. If Phyllis marries an earl, her ...


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NOTE: This answer answers the previous question 'What were Gilbert's views on women's education?'. I will try and also answer the new question. It seems he was very pro-women, there is a lot of evidence to suggest he was a feminist. From Jane Stedman's biography - W.S. Gilbert: A Classic Victorian and his Theater: "Gilbert always enjoyed the company of ...


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