38

Samuel Fischer, who founded the S. Fischer Verlag in 1886 was also Jewish. After his death in 1934, his son-in-law Gottfried Bermann Fischer took over management of the publishing house, but in 1936 he left Germany with Samuel Fischer's widow. They first went to Vienna, taking part of the catalogue with them, and there continued publishing under the name &...


16

"Torch dance" is the translation of Fackeltanz. The Fackeltanz is similair to the polonaise but the dancers hold torches or candles in their hands and move according to fixed patterns. There is nothing indecent about this dance. In fact, it was still danced at the wedding of emperor Wilhelms II's daughter Viktoria Luise with Ernst August zu ...


14

This answer is primarily based on Ignace Feuerlicht, "Omissions and Contradictions in Kafka's Trial", The German Quarterly 1967, 40(3), pp. 339-350 - available here if you have Jstor access. All quotes below are from this article unless otherwise stated. As mentioned in the OP, there is little explicit information in the text indicating a precise location. ...


13

The “war of seventy” refers to the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, and this is confirmed by the mention of Otto von Bismarck, the Chancellor of the North German Confederation at the outbreak of the war, and from 1871 the Chancellor of the German Empire. So the “cross” must be the Iron Cross, a military decoration created in Napoleonic-era Prussia, and revived ...


11

While Easter sure comes with a significant religious meaning, it seems to be distinctly its more earthly and mundane aspects that are emphasised in Faust. Though, the connections to resurrection aren't there for nothing either and surely intertwined with its less religious importance. If we take a look at the situation when we're introduced to Easter, ...


10

It is important to distinguish between the original text and the English translation. If one only allows for text-immanent interpretation and considers the translation the sole text, all my following arguments are pointless. Furthermore, I'm not saying that the interpretation of Atreyu considering the queen to be a monster is wrong per se, but I want to ...


9

I actually made a list of all of these many years ago, which deserves to be recorded for posterity. Here they are, in the order that they appear in the text. The four messengers: Gluckuk, Vooshvazool, Pyornkrachzark, and Blubb. During the long waiting period, the four so unalike messengers became good friends. From then on they stayed together. But that's ...


9

There are multiple hints that the unnamed city the plot takes place in is a reminiscence of Genzano di Roma. Ende has lived there during the writing of Momo, and the Italian background (the names, but also the ancient amphitheatre) hint at that. Apparently, Ende himself has acknowledged the influence in an interview, but I could not find the original ...


9

At the end of the 19th century Arnold Böcklin was a well-known painter. Die Gefilde der Seligen, apparently the painting the book refers to, had been commissioned in 1876 by the National Gallery. After its exhibition caused a public scandal it was quickly removed: The female nudity in the foreground, the provocative wild virility of the centaur carrying the ...


8

This answer is primarily based on Ignace Feuerlicht, "Omissions and Contradictions in Kafka's Trial", The German Quarterly 1967, 40(3), pp. 339-350 - available here if you have Jstor access. All quotes below are from this article. Josef K.'s last name is not the only, though perhaps it is the most prominent, piece of information which is carefully not ...


8

The original German text reads, on page 232 in the linked edition: Inzwischen ist Besuch gekommen, zwei Funker, die freigebig zum Essen eingeladen werden. Sie sitzen im Wohnzimmer, wo ein Klavier steht. The German word "Funker" means radio operator. (From the German word Funke for spark, funkeln = "to sparkle", etc. The funk morpheme was used ...


8

TL; DR: There is an ambiguity, intended by the author, between "do what you wish" and "find your true will" which is important for the development of the main character Bastian. Long answer: To answer the question we can look at what the author himself said or wrote about it. The following comment is from a typescript from his literary estate. I quote it ...


8

That Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche falsified her brother's letters and other writings was something that several scholars had already been aware of before her death in 1935. This includes scholars such as Heinrich Rickert and Erich Friedrich Podach. The Nietzsche-Archiv founded by Elisabeth Nietzsche supported several editions of the philosopher's work. These ...


7

In the original, it's B and K, not B and C. You can see this in the German Wikipedia page (emphasis mine): Bastian Balthasar Bux ist ein zehn oder elf Jahre alter, in sich gekehrter Junge. Sein Vater hat den Tod seiner Frau, Bastians Mutter, nie verkraftet, flüchtet sich in seine Arbeit und beachtet seinen Sohn kaum noch. In der Schule ist der Junge ein ...


7

The German version reads Do what you want (Tu Was Du Willst). The ambiguity could exist in German as well with Tu Was Du Wünscht, albeit that would be a less common phrase and kids probably had trouble understanding it. The quote that follows the inscription (chapter M, p.199 in my edition): [...] Wichtig war allein, dass die Worte die Erlaubnis, nein, ...


7

The comment doesn't need to reference a real painting to make sense in the context of the novel, but some searching shows that Fontane had a particular painting in mind. Since Hesiod, Elysium has also been known as the "Isles of the Blessed" or the "Fortunate Isles" and there are several paintings and artworks that have been inspired by ...


6

The simplest explanation, in-universe so to speak, would be that you need a new unique name to see the Childlike Empress, and "Mondenkind" isn't really a word that existed before in the German language (certainly not in common parlance). Even the more correct compound noun "Mondkind" would be unusual. "Monden" ist dative plural, ...


6

Perhaps it's deliberately meant to be ambiguous. Certainly there's a recurrent theme in The Neverending Story of ambiguous endings and unfinished tales: just look at how often variations of the phrase "that's another story and will be told another time" are repeated throughout the novel. Ende is leaving a lot to our imagination, deliberately so. In fact, ...


6

Hortulus Animae (or better in French) is the usual answer. See, for instance, section 3 of this essay: Just as one need not know precisely which "certain German book" Poe is referring to in order to proceed to the second paragraph and beyond—again, we do not learn the identity of this book until the story's last sentence—so one does not need to be able ...


6

Beforehand, they didn't know the effect of the swamp. When Atreyu and Artax first reach the swamp, it looks gloomy and forbidding but no more than that. Despite the name, they didn't realise that anyone entering it would get so depressed that they sank into the swamp. The little horse uttered one last soft neigh. "You can't help me, master. It's all ...


6

The original German text begins with the following lines: »Wann treffen wir drei wieder zusamm'?«   »Um die siebente Stund', am Brückendamm.«    »Am Mittelpfeiler.« »Ich lösche die Flamm'.« Compare this with the opening lines of the translation by Dorothea Tieck, first published in 1832 (in: Shakspeare's dramatische Werke. Übersetzt von August ...


6

When adapting the book title you name a little and spelling it "Likedeeler", together with the statement "which was to deal with certain bold, half-mythical pirates of the fourteenth century." from your question, it seems quite apparent that the novel was to be focused on the Victual Brothers who later called themselves "Likedeeler&...


6

Fontane was working on several projects when he died. As mantioned in Cahir Mawr Dyffryn æp Ceallach's answer, one of these was Die Likedeeler. "Likedeeler" was the Low German name of the "Vitalienbrüder" (Victual Brothers, a group of late 13th-century privateers). One of the most famous names associated with them was Klaus Störtebeker. ...


5

In "Conversations with Jim Harrison", Harrison said (link): "I had to speak at Sam Lawrence's memorial service in New York and I was flipping through books again. Stephen Mitchell's translation of the Duino Elegies. At the end there are what show business calls "out takes", intended lines that Rilke didn't use. I said one at the memorial service: "...


5

The most famous phrase from Goethe's play Götz von Berlichingen is "er kann mich im Arsche lecken!" This is taken from the third act, when Götz von Berlichingen's castle is being besieged and a herald comes to tell him it were better to surrender. This leads to a response that made the play famous: Mich ergeben! Auf Gnad und Ungnad! Mit wem redet Ihr! Bin ...


5

The quatrain is the last stanza of the poem Gesang der Geister über den Wassern, which Goethe wrote in 1779 during a stay in Switzerland. The poem was inspired by the Staubbach Falls near the village of Lauterbrunnen. In order to understand the comparisons in the last stanza, it is helpful to discuss what the poem is about. The first stanza compares the ...


4

It's because the Germans, at the turn of the 18th century until the time of Hitler, saw the Greeks as the fons et origo of themselves. & because Beethoven was at the cleavage of the old moral thinking, and the Romantics, or, what we know as creative thinking. The history of Mozart's Don Giovanni brings this out most sharply. With the final scene being ...


4

I consulted Heinrich Heine: Sämtliche Werke. Düsseldorfer Ausgabe, in 16 volumes, published by Hoffmann und Campe in the 1990s. The register of titles and first lines (in volume 16) does not list "Frühlingsbotschaft", but it does list the first line "Leise zieht durch mein Gemüth". The poem starting with the line "Leise zieht durch ...


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