16

First off, if anybody fancies reading these fairy tales, here is a good copy of it. It's mostly translated from the final edition of the original Brothers Grimm books, but with a small part from the first edition.1 To start, the Brothers Grimm grew up in a well-to-do family in Hanau, Germany. Jacob was born in January 1785 and Wilhelm in February 1786, but ...


10

While Easter sure comes with a significant religious meaning, it seems to be distinctly its more earthly and mundane aspects that are emphasised in Faust. Though, the connections to resurrection aren't there for nothing either and surely intertwined with its less religious importance. If we take a look at the situation when we're introduced to Easter, ...


10

This answer is primarily based on Ignace Feuerlicht, "Omissions and Contradictions in Kafka's Trial", The German Quarterly 1967, 40(3), pp. 339-350 - available here if you have Jstor access. All quotes below are from this article unless otherwise stated. As mentioned in the OP, there is little explicit information in the text indicating a precise location. ...


9

It is important to distinguish between the original text and the English translation. If one only allows for text-immanent interpretation and considers the translation the sole text, all my following arguments are pointless. Furthermore, I'm not saying that the interpretation of Atreyu considering the queen to be a monster is wrong per se, but I want to ...


7

This answer is primarily based on Ignace Feuerlicht, "Omissions and Contradictions in Kafka's Trial", The German Quarterly 1967, 40(3), pp. 339-350 - available here if you have Jstor access. All quotes below are from this article. Josef K.'s last name is not the only, though perhaps it is the most prominent, piece of information which is carefully not ...


7

There are multiple hints that the unnamed city the plot takes place in is a reminiscence of Genzano di Roma. Ende has lived there during the writing of Momo, and the Italian background (the names, but also the ancient amphitheatre) hint at that. Apparently, Ende himself has acknowledged the influence in an interview, but I could not find the original ...


7

The original German text reads, on page 232 in the linked edition: Inzwischen ist Besuch gekommen, zwei Funker, die freigebig zum Essen eingeladen werden. Sie sitzen im Wohnzimmer, wo ein Klavier steht. The German word "Funker" means radio operator. (From the German word Funke for spark, funkeln = "to sparkle", etc. The funk morpheme was used ...


7

I actually made a list of all of these many years ago, which deserves to be recorded for posterity. Here they are, in the order that they appear in the text. The four messengers: Gluckuk, Vooshvazool, Pyornkrachzark, and Blubb. During the long waiting period, the four so unalike messengers became good friends. From then on they stayed together. But that'...


7

The German version reads Do what you want (Tu Was Du Willst). The ambiguity could exist in German as well with Tu Was Du Wünscht, albeit that would be a less common phrase and kids probably had trouble understanding it. The quote that follows the inscription (chapter M, p.199 in my edition): [...] Wichtig war allein, dass die Worte die Erlaubnis, nein, ...


6

TL; DR: There is an ambiguity, intended by the author, between "do what you wish" and "find your true will" which is important for the development of the main character Bastian. Long answer: To answer the question we can look at what the author himself said or wrote about it. The following comment is from a typescript from his literary estate. I quote it ...


6

In the original, it's B and K, not B and C. You can see this in the German Wikipedia page (emphasis mine): Bastian Balthasar Bux ist ein zehn oder elf Jahre alter, in sich gekehrter Junge. Sein Vater hat den Tod seiner Frau, Bastians Mutter, nie verkraftet, flüchtet sich in seine Arbeit und beachtet seinen Sohn kaum noch. In der Schule ist der Junge ein ...


6

Beforehand, they didn't know the effect of the swamp. When Atreyu and Artax first reach the swamp, it looks gloomy and forbidding but no more than that. Despite the name, they didn't realise that anyone entering it would get so depressed that they sank into the swamp. The little horse uttered one last soft neigh. "You can't help me, master. It's all ...


6

Hortulus Animae (or better in French) is the usual answer. See, for instance, section 3 of this essay: Just as one need not know precisely which "certain German book" Poe is referring to in order to proceed to the second paragraph and beyond—again, we do not learn the identity of this book until the story's last sentence—so one does not need to be able ...


5

Perhaps it's deliberately meant to be ambiguous. Certainly there's a recurrent theme in The Neverending Story of ambiguous endings and unfinished tales: just look at how often variations of the phrase "that's another story and will be told another time" are repeated throughout the novel. Ende is leaving a lot to our imagination, deliberately so. In fact, ...


5

In "Conversations with Jim Harrison", Harrison said (link): "I had to speak at Sam Lawrence's memorial service in New York and I was flipping through books again. Stephen Mitchell's translation of the Duino Elegies. At the end there are what show business calls "out takes", intended lines that Rilke didn't use. I said one at the memorial service: "...


4

I consulted Heinrich Heine: Sämtliche Werke. Düsseldorfer Ausgabe, in 16 volumes, published by Hoffmann und Campe in the 1990s. The register of titles and first lines (in volume 16) does not list "Frühlingsbotschaft", but it does list the first line "Leise zieht durch mein Gemüth". The poem starting with the line "Leise zieht durch mein Gemüt" is poem VI of ...


4

I don't know how accurate this is, as I haven't read the book, but I found an online map which seems to map the exact paths he took, so it seems that you can take the same journey as him. The website is called LITMAP (Literature Maps) which appear to have used google maps to trace the paths. It can be found here. I'll add a couple of screenshots below: It ...


4

There are several aspects why Die Verwandlung is based on the life of Franz Kafka. Kafka wrote the book during the period he was depressed and he had sleeping disorders, which means he couldn't function very well in daily life. Gregor Samsa also can't function because of his metamorphosis. Kafka had a good relation with his sister and a bad relation with ...


4

Borchert wrote Das Brot (The Bread) in 1946 and Die Küchenuhr (The Clock) in early 1947. Both stories involve a man eating bread at half past two. In English, the translation "half past two in the morning" is a bit misleading, since the German phrase "halb drei" says neither "Morgen/morgens" (morning/in the morning) nor "Nacht/nachts" (night/at night). ...


3

'Herr' is a German Honorific (words that are used when addressing a person that can indicate and connote a great variety of different qualities) that is used to convey the highest level of respect. In English, honorifics serve a similar purpose but don't carry the same importance in conversation as they do in a language like German or Russian, where using a ...


3

The first thing I think of when thinking of a tortoise is its longevity. Also note that Cassiopeia has her own time (which is why she cam move when time has stopped), and if I remember correctly, Hora, when saying this, also says that she will still live after all others are gone. Because of this, I think she's the personification of eternity. Eternity will ...


3

Kafka didn't technically finish the book, but it's worth noting that at the ending, Agents executed Josef K. This suggests that whatever agency was doing the prosecution had at least some capacity to act. Unfortunately, due to the fact that the novel isn't complete, it's not clear exactly what happened to cause that to happen (other than Josef K. being told ...


3

I consulted two editions of Hermann Hesse's poems: Die Gedichte, edited by Volker Michels (Berlin: Suhrkamp, 1953; reprinted in 1977 and again with an afterword and dates in 1992). Die Gedichte, Volume 10 in: Hermann Hesse: Sämtliche Werke (Berlin: Suhrkamp, 2002; this is part of a 20-volume edition of Hesse's works, edited by Volker Michels). In both ...


3

It's because the Germans, at the turn of the 18th century until the time of Hitler, saw the Greeks as the fons et origo of themselves. & because Beethoven was at the cleavage of the old moral thinking, and the Romantics, or, what we know as creative thinking. The history of Mozart's Don Giovanni brings this out most sharply. With the final scene being ...


3

According to the listed attributions in 'The Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm All-New Third Edition' the source was Ludwig Aurbacher The Little Shepherd Boy “Das Hirtenbüblein” (1819). Source: Ludwig Aurbacher he seems to have been something of a polymath. The work of Aurbacher covers a wide range. From pedagogy, psychology, philology ...


2

It seems to be from the poem "Der Schauende", variously translated into English as "The Man Watching" or "The Beholder". The original German text of this quote is: Die Siege laden ihn nicht ein. Sein Wachstum ist: der Tiefbesiegte von immer Größerem zu sein. It's been translated into English in a number of ways, including: Winning does not tempt ...


2

From what I can find, they existed in written form from quite early in the 13th century, and it wasn't until the 19th century that the veracity of the event was challenged. From the wiki on Sangerkreig: The oldest poetic accounts, dating from the 13th century, describe specific episodes of the contest such as the Fürstenlob and the Rätselspiel. The ...


2

I know this has been already answered, but this is my interpretation of why K. repeatedly went to the summons. K. is holds his reputation above all else and his fear that he may be deemed guilty and there after looked down upon by others gnaws at him. He tries to pretend that he doesn't care when in reality this scenario is making him go paranoid. K. is a ...


2

Yes. Academic articles specifically about this book, in both English and German: Beate Petra Kory, "Herta Müllers Sprachpantomime Atemschaukel Ein Annäherungsversuch an die Zentralmetapher des Romans", Temeswarer Beiträge zur Germanistik, Band 10 (2013), pp. 59-67. German title translates to "Herta Müller's language pantomime [?] Atemschaukel: an approach ...


2

Would it be "Till Eulenspiegel. Münchhausen. Die Schildbürger" Its a hardcover book and sorry I am not German and don't speak a drop of German but I am going to guess its this because its a hard cover book with several short stories. I found the book here: https://www.amazon.de/Till-Eulenspiegel-M%C3%BCnchhausen-Schildb%C3%BCrger-einem/dp/B004WCWPNC ...


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