7

Even the Party has to make some concessions to reality. Sure, they can work on Winston until Anything could be true. The so-called laws of Nature were nonsense. The law of gravity was nonsense. 'If I wished,' O'Brien had said, 'I could float off this floor like a soap bubble.' Winston worked it out. 'If he thinks he floats off the floor, and if I ...


6

While edition 1 is not imperfect, edition 2 is more perfect than edition 1. Repeat as each new, more perfect, edition is released. After all, "perfect" is not necessarily an absolute quality in Newspeak. (As exemplified in the latest, doubleplusperfect, edition of the dictionary.)


4

While the narration claims this is a cryptic answer, it is more in the sense of being cryptic to the other animals than to the reader. Benjamin is the oldest animal and the reader can intuit from this that he has seen a lot of events on the farm that the other animals have not. This is the meaning of "Donkeys live a long time". "None of you ...


4

Almost certainly "buggers". Several other possible options ("bastards", "balls") are used later in the book without bowdlerisation. 'Now, you damned swab, will you take that back?' 'No, I will not.' 'You oily swine! You nigger's Nancy Boy! You crawling, sneaking, f - - bloody bastard!' 'Order!' exclaimed Mr Macgregor. and 'Here, Macgregor, ...


3

The only evidence of the existence (or non-existence) of the Brotherhood comes directly from the Party itself. As such, its existence (or non-existence) may simply be part of the mystique of Big Brother and the party apparatus. Winston is told about the Brotherhood on a daily basis. A day never passed when spies and saboteurs acting under his directions ...


3

In The Collected Essays, Journalism, and Letters of George Orwell, he expresses this view many times. (After the war, he reflected on how he tended to overestimate forces pushing toward socialism and underestimate on those pushing away.) The problem with identifying exactly when he said the concept first is that you have to decide exactly how close the idea ...


2

In the Tsarist system, there was an upper class of aristocracy that controlled the country and had a standard of living much higher than the general population. Then there was a revolution that overthrew that system, and then the revolution was hijacked by the Bolsheviks, who claimed to be taking the country over on behalf of the people to destroy the class ...


2

They think Big Brother knows and sees all, and they're pretty much right. In the very first chapter, in the opening paragraphs of the story, the first time we're introduced to the telescreens, we're also introduced to the normality of permanent all-encompassing surveillance: The telescreen received and transmitted simultaneously. Any sound that Winston made,...


2

That is an interesting phrase "sort of vague reverence". Were I to write that passage, I would have not added that phrase. A careful writer picks his words carefully & a careless editor, thinking they were superfluous, would be tempted to delete them. Yet he did, which suggests his words here are intentional, & worth looking more closely at. "...


2

O'Brien is the party, he is the one who creates the reality for others. He is a member of the "Inner Party" and the one who creates the illusion; O'Brien is the one in charge of everything and controlling society, and he is the one that labels thought criminals so.


1

No, here is the definition of the term silent protest: Silent protest is an organized effort where the participants stay quiet to demonstrate disapproval. It is used as a form of civil disobedience and nonviolent resistance (Wikipedia). There is nothing silent about his protest. You might be able to consider it culture jamming but I'm not too familiar ...


1

what is the dreadful thing that was skipped over? Orwell is painting a picture of a dissident in a totalitarian regime and how that system suffocates the human spirit. The 'dreadful thing' is exactly what Winston thought of this system. It's dreadful and terrifying. Once his spirit is broken then it's no longer dreadful, everything was 'all right'. 'There ...


1

as an allegory, he represents the average bystander. -- a quote -- "life will go as it always goes -- that is, badly." //he knows what it was like with jones and comes to the conclusion that no matter who is in charge or what changes are made at the farm, it will remain an unpleasant place to be. he also knows of all the injustice occurring on ...


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