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This answer is primarily based on Ignace Feuerlicht, "Omissions and Contradictions in Kafka's Trial", The German Quarterly 1967, 40(3), pp. 339-350 - available here if you have Jstor access. All quotes below are from this article unless otherwise stated. As mentioned in the OP, there is little explicit information in the text indicating a precise location. ...


7

This answer is primarily based on Ignace Feuerlicht, "Omissions and Contradictions in Kafka's Trial", The German Quarterly 1967, 40(3), pp. 339-350 - available here if you have Jstor access. All quotes below are from this article. Josef K.'s last name is not the only, though perhaps it is the most prominent, piece of information which is carefully not ...


4

There are several aspects why Die Verwandlung is based on the life of Franz Kafka. Kafka wrote the book during the period he was depressed and he had sleeping disorders, which means he couldn't function very well in daily life. Gregor Samsa also can't function because of his metamorphosis. Kafka had a good relation with his sister and a bad relation with ...


3

Kafka didn't technically finish the book, but it's worth noting that at the ending, Agents executed Josef K. This suggests that whatever agency was doing the prosecution had at least some capacity to act. Unfortunately, due to the fact that the novel isn't complete, it's not clear exactly what happened to cause that to happen (other than Josef K. being told ...


2

I know this has been already answered, but this is my interpretation of why K. repeatedly went to the summons. K. is holds his reputation above all else and his fear that he may be deemed guilty and there after looked down upon by others gnaws at him. He tries to pretend that he doesn't care when in reality this scenario is making him go paranoid. K. is a ...


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