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The beginning of chapter 19 says that Frankenstein spent six months in London assembling the ‘materials’ for the new creature, before setting out for the Scottish island. London was our present point of rest; we determined to remain several months in this wonderful and celebrated city. […] I now also began to collect the materials necessary for my new ...


6

Essentially, Yes. The other stories were abandoned. On that famous night, there were four people trying their hands at ghost stories: Lord Byron, Percy Shelley, his wife to be Mary Godwin and John Polidori who was not known as a writer but was serving as Byron's physician. We won't go over the genesis of Mary's tale, Frankenstein, as this is well known. ...


5

The first relevant document I managed to discover on this is an undergraduate biology thesis titled The Real "Monster" in Frankenstein. Here is an extract from the abstract: I argue that that the real “monster” of the story is in fact Victor Frankenstein who is suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and that the “monster” is really just a delusions ...


5

Actually, it started very early on and probably wasn't inspired by anything in particular. Probably it was created of either laziness ("Frankenstein's monster" is so long) or ignorance ("Dracula" is both the name of the book and the monster). As I wrote elsewhere, using "Frankenstein" to refer to Frankenstein’s monster dates back to at least 1838, only 20 ...


3

The phrase "natural lord and king" (or just "natural lord") refers to the king. There are various examples of this: texts about and by King Charles II: ... That we do not represent this day the Person of a Tyrant or Usurper as some of late have done, but the Per∣son of our natural Lord and King, Charles the second, by the Grace of God of England, ...


3

I think the closest you come to an answer is in the first paragraph of chapter I (of the Project Gutenberg edition) I am by birth a Genevese, and my family is one of the most distinguished of that republic. My ancestors had been for many years counsellors and syndics, and my father had filled several public situations with honour and reputation. He was ...


3

An easy might-be-true answer is in Wikipedia: from Burg Frankenstein, a castle in Germany, where your predecessors conjectured Shelley visited and possibly drew inspiration from the castle's legends. This story is not universally believed, however. See the essay "Frankenstein – the monster’s home?" by Michael Mueller for a forceful denial of every ...


2

In this case, "habits" is probably using the definition of "a settled tendency or usual manner of behavior". Once this trance that led to him creating the Creature had passed, he returned to his normal way of life, and he was acutely aware of what it was that he had been doing, now making his limbs tremble and eyes swim as he thinks back ...


2

"It" does not refer to anything; it is an impersonal pronoun that is required by the syntax but does not have any real meaning. It is basically the same "it" as in "It's ten o'clock." By "the science", the narrator means science in general, which for him apparently includes both "natural philosophy" and ...


2

“Her sympathy was ours” is ambiguous between two meanings: “her sympathy was [the same as] our sympathy”, that is, she was sympathetic to the same things that we were sympathetic to (whatever they were); “her sympathy belonged to us”, that is, she was sympathetic with us. In both readings, “we” and “us” refer to the narrator, Victor Frankenstein, and his ...


2

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarlet_fever Check out the wikipedia entry on that one, I don't know if this is really related, but it is a bacterial infection. Considering that at the time the story goes there were no antibiotics, I might be mistaken on this one but I think people didn't even used to wash hands when handling sick people, I don't know how ...


2

It seems really unlikely that there's any single path, and the monster is "a Frankenstein" in at least some of the same ways that a Model T. is "a Ford" or Guernica is "a Picasso." But James Whale is also obviously a key tributary of the drifting reference. James Whale's 1931 movie with Boris Karloff (the seminal visual depiction of the monster) totally ...


2

Yes, there is evidence to suggest that Frankenstein was influenced by revolution, the pace of technological change and debates over racial equality. (It's also a book about parenthood.) As has been helpfully pointed out - the revolution in context of the book is the French Revolution: If “Frankenstein” is a referendum on the French Revolution, as some ...


1

The language of the time tended to be a little Yoda-like in its grammar, so you have to be patient with it. Also, all three of your lines run together to explain one thing: That Victor loved someone, and lost her, and now feels empty and alone without her. 1. “And expressed my conviction that a man could boast of little happiness, who did not enjoy this ...


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