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The beginning of chapter 19 says that Frankenstein spent six months in London assembling the ‘materials’ for the new creature, before setting out for the Scottish island. London was our present point of rest; we determined to remain several months in this wonderful and celebrated city. […] I now also began to collect the materials necessary for my ...


6

Essentially, Yes. The other stories were abandoned. On that famous night, there were four people trying their hands at ghost stories: Lord Byron, Percy Shelley, his wife to be Mary Godwin and John Polidori who was not known as a writer but was serving as Byron's physician. We won't go over the genesis of Mary's tale, Frankenstein, as this is well known. ...


3

I think the closest you come to an answer is in the first paragraph of chapter I (of the Project Gutenberg edition) I am by birth a Genevese, and my family is one of the most distinguished of that republic. My ancestors had been for many years counsellors and syndics, and my father had filled several public situations with honour and reputation. He was ...


3

The phrase "natural lord and king" (or just "natural lord") refers to the king. There are various examples of this: texts about and by King Charles II: ... That we do not represent this day the Person of a Tyrant or Usurper as some of late have done, but the Per∣son of our natural Lord and King, Charles the second, by the Grace of God of England, ...


3

An easy might-be-true answer is in Wikipedia: from Burg Frankenstein, a castle in Germany, where your predecessors conjectured Shelly visited and possibly drew inspiration from the castle's legends. This story is not universally believed, however. See this essay by Michael Mueller for a forceful denial of every insinuation found in the Wikipedia article.


2

Yes, there is evidence to suggest that Frankenstein was influenced by revolution, the pace of technological change and debates over racial equality. (It's also a book about parenthood.) As has been helpfully pointed out - the revolution in context of the book is the French Revolution: If “Frankenstein” is a referendum on the French Revolution, as some ...


1

By stages. In Chapter 12 he learns to speak: "By degrees I made a discovery of still greater moment. I found that these people possessed a method of communicating their experience and feelings to one another by articulate sounds. I perceived that the words they spoke sometimes produced pleasure or pain, smiles or sadness, in the minds and countenances of ...


1

It states in the book itself that the monster hid and watched a family interact, and learned words and things such as advanced literature that way. There are some theories I've heard about how the monster could learn so quickly. The monster may actually have been more intelligent or a quicker learner than the average human. Perhaps the monster was like a ...


1

The language of the time tended to be a little Yoda-like in its grammar, so you have to be patient with it. Also, all three of your lines run together to explain one thing: That Victor loved someone, and lost her, and now feels empty and alone without her. 1. “And expressed my conviction that a man could boast of little happiness, who did not enjoy this ...


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