33

No. Some fairy tales don't have morals, and lots that do have morals that aren't that useful. For instance, the Grimm brothers wrote many amoral stories, and many (not just the Grimm's) are believed to be jabs at the government or royalty at the time. (Possible)* Examples: Snow White is based on Margarete von Waldeck, a girl with a horrible relationship ...


24

No. There's a terminology conflict here. A fairy tale is a fantastical adventure, set in an indistinguishable far-off place and time, in which a good character goes through hardship and comes out with a good/happy ending. A fable, such as Aesop's fables, is likewise a fictional tale, but is usually shorter and does illustrate a moral point. For example, ...


18

That went a lot further down the rabbit-hole than I expected. There doesn't seem to be a lot of agreement on the origin of the phrase. It wouldn't seem like it would be a very old reference, since tobacco was introduced to Korea in the early 1600s. This Reddit post claims that it comes from an earlier phrase about eating the tobacco and might actually have ...


10

Note As mentioned in the comments, a challenge was posted contesting the content of this answer. I answered the challenge with multiple real-world usages and the alleged origins of the expression. I'm linking it here as it serves as a further elaboration of this answer. I want to add a counteranswer here, not because I think Sean's answer is wrong, but ...


10

The story of the Blind Men and the Elephant is well-known in the West. Perhaps mostly due to the version of the tale written by John Godfrey Saxe, a 19th-century US poet who retold the story as a poem, attributing it to "a Hindoo fable"; you can read his version here. It's also been told as a song in a 21st-century album by a US singer. Wikipedia ...


8

You don't know how funny it is to read this. This requires both cultural knowledge of Korea as well as the language. The "Heavenly Lord" or in this context is formally called Haneulnim (하늘님, "Heavenly King"). "Heaven" in this context is not the afterlife, but the literal sky and everything in the sky. I'm not too sure on the ...


8

From the dictionary definition of a fable: A short story, typically with animals as characters, conveying a moral Oxford Dictionaries: "Fable" Merriam Webster defines Fairy tale as: a story (as for children) involving fantastic forces and beings (as fairies, wizards, and goblins) and a story in which improbable events lead to a happy ending ...


8

There are great variations of how trolls are portrayed, but it is not primarily a matter of national literature. I will be focusing on Sweden and Norway, where I know the traditions best. First, we should note that trolls range in appearance from some that are quite human-like, to the point that they are able to move in human society and can only be spotted ...


7

According to the 1839 edition of Robert Southey's The Story of the Three Bears it was because their chairs' cushions were disturbed: "Somebody in my chair has sat!" With voice so gruff and great The Huge bear said, when he saw that His cushion was not straight. "Somebody in my chair has been!" The middle Bear exclaim'd; Seeing the cushion ...


7

I'm reasonably certain that Irving's major inspiration for Rip van Winkle was the German folktale Peter Klaus (text here). Almost all the analyses I've read give it precedence over other works (Karl Katz, for instance is a similar, though less-well-documented story). There are many similarities that quickly indicate some connection: The main character ...


6

Yes, certainly, but we don't know exactly which one(s). The Wikipedia page for the story lists many possible literary forerunners from both European and Native American folk and fairy tale traditions -- so many that it's difficult to say whether Irving was inspired by one in particular or some larger subset of the candidates. He was very erudite and had ...


4

In Korean, the story is called 호랑이와 곶감. I would personally go with the translation: “The Tiger and the Dried Persimmons", but this isn't the exact translation. First, I’ll address the food, because it’s simpler. In Korean, it's called 곶감. There are actually four types of persimmons enjoyed in Korea, but I'll just explain the two types. Regular persimmon ...


4

It's from scores of fairy tales. There is the trope where asking for one means you get given the other, but there is the trope where the less impressive looking thing is the more powerful. The casket itself is used in The Two Caskets The girl left the room to go to the loft, and as soon as she got outside, she found all the cats waiting for her. Walking in ...


4

The original source seems to be ‘Pierce Penilesse, His Supplication to the Divell’ by Thomas Nashe, published in 1592. Nor haue we one or two kinde of drunkards onely, but eight kindes. The first is Ape drunke, and he leapes, and sings, and hollowes, and daunceth for the heauens: the second is Lion drunke, and he flings the pots about the house, calls his ...


3

when Koreans say "back when tigers smoked," this is kind of the equivalent of Americans saying "long ago, when dinosaurs used to roam the Earth" except that dinosaurs actually existed and we're not sure if tigers ever smoked. It just means to say that it was a very long ago. A lot of Korean folktales have to do with tigers if you have ...


2

Well, let's clear the first misconception: Fairy tales aren't for children. Or at least, not all of them weren't meant to be for children until much later. Most fairy tales originated as folk tales that peasants and farmers would tell each other, presumably to pass time and lighten the drudgery of working. Zohar Shavit, in an analysis of fairytales in, "The ...


2

No, not as far as I know of. Most Korean folk tales are similar to European fairy tales in the sense that each story may share similar themes and motifs, the specifics don't seem to relate. I could be wrong, but this seems to be an independent folk tale rather than part of a continuity of a sort. The sun and the moon don't normally make an appearance in most ...


2

Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm published the first edition of their fairy tale collection in 1812 (first volume) and 1815 (second volume). This collection was republished in 1819, 1837, 1840, 1843, 1850 and 1857. This collection eventually contained 211 fairy tales and is known as the "big edition" (große Ausgabe). In addition, there was a "small ...


1

The Grimm brothers were the first writers to actually try to collect and preserve fairy tales as such, and not as raw material to make literary works out of. Nevertheless they did modify the tales for various reasons, for instance, thinking they were reconstructing an original tale from a defective copy. After their first edition, they also made ...


1

Your arbitrary criteria I am contesting your criteria. Your criteria are not relevant to my original claim. Your requirement for Dutch originating sources: Belgium is trilingual and the language regions may predominantly be separate, but the local culture is shared and/or overlaps. Just because the Flemish speak Dutch doesn't mean that their entire culture ...


1

The chairs were disorganized and put in an unorderly fashion, suggesting that they had recently moved, along with the seat cushions (as stated in the other answer).


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