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46 votes
Accepted

Meaning of "bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthur-nuk!"

It's a nonce word and is used only in Finnegans Wake. I have no clue why Joyce made it so long (perhaps he wanted to catch readers' attention and persuade them to read Finnegans Wake). It's defined by ...
Decapitated Soul's user avatar
22 votes

Why is Gravity’s Rainbow considered postmodern, yet Finnegans Wake is not?

The answer to this is very simply one of time frames. Modernism is the name given to a series of linked movements across the arts that spans from the late 19th century to roughly the Second World War. ...
Matt Thrower's user avatar
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20 votes
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Why is Gravity’s Rainbow considered postmodern, yet Finnegans Wake is not?

The premise of your question is unjustified. It is a very widespread view that Finnegans Wake is precisely a postmodernist work. Take a look, for instance, at this answer on here, which states: ...
Segorian's user avatar
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12 votes

Meaning of "bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthur-nuk!"

Ahh yes, the impeccable word: bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthur- nuk! only opposed by Shakespeare's honorificabilitudinitatibus and the ...
Tom O' Bedlam's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Does Joyce, in Finnegans Wake or Ulysses, link the sound form "hoe" to "whore"?

Most of these aren't saying "whore". The one that does is "Hohore", which according to this page is actually "ho whore"; "ho" here is the exclamation. Also, note the r in "hore". The Oxford English ...
Laurel's user avatar
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8 votes

What languages should one know to appreciate Finnegans Wake?

I found some quotes from Wikipedia about how to read it. They seem to suggest that you should appreciate the rhythm more than anything. Eugene Jolas said: Those who have heard Mr. Joyce read ...
Matrim Cauthon's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Did Joyce "estimate" how many readers would understand Finnegans Wake?

I found a quote that may be what you're remembering, or slightly misremembering. It's not from Joyce himself, but I think it's close enough to be worth posting as an answer. It concerns Work in ...
Rand al'Thor's user avatar
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5 votes
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Where is the yellow in "pasqualines" from Finnegans Wake?

I think you are correct when you identify the Pasqualina. On this site we read (in Google assisted translation, that perhaps the only element that truly defines this Genoese savory cake is the whole ...
Spagirl's user avatar
  • 19.1k
5 votes

Where is the yellow in "pasqualines" from Finnegans Wake?

One possibility: daffodils are called paasbloemen (Easter flowers) or paaslelies (Easter lilies) in Dutch. This is a fairly roundabout connection, but it's possible that this is Joyce's connection of ...
Peter Shor's user avatar
  • 12.6k
3 votes

Who wrote the well-known Outline of Chapter Contents in the Penguin edition of Finnegans Wake?

I suspect that the ‘Outline of Chapter Contents’ was written by Seamus Deane, who edited the Joyce editions for Penguin in the early 1990s. The evidence I have for this is that the following editions ...
Gareth Rees's user avatar
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3 votes
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What does Nuvoletta's disappearance signify in Finnegans Wake?

As I understand it, Nuvoletta ... disappeared in the end of the excerpt. In Finnegans Wake, no one ever disappears, at least not for very long, because they always have to begin again! While the song ...
fundagain's user avatar
  • 1,943
3 votes

Meaning of "bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthur-nuk!"

tl;dr The hundredlettered name again, last word of perfect language. [III.1.424.23] That long thunder sounding onomatopoeic word, is was the sound of Finnegan as he falls to his death from a ladder, ...
fundagain's user avatar
  • 1,943
2 votes
Accepted

In chapter I.5 of Finnegans Wake, how are the "paper wounds" ordered?

The clue to this question is in the text itself. By using the word "respectively", Joyce is telling the reader to take the marks in the order he has listed them. For example the Collins ...
Matt Thrower's user avatar
  • 22.6k
2 votes
Accepted

Does "egourge" in Finnegans Wake derive from the Greek "egoourgos" meaning "worker for the self"?

Warning: I don't know any Greek (ancient or modern), so trust this answer at your own risk. Dramaturge comes from Greek dramatourgos, which breaks down into drama + ourgós (worker). Similarly for ...
Peter Shor's user avatar
  • 12.6k
1 vote

Joyce, Nora Barnacle and Papishee

Tindall is not to be recommended. Too little detail and much of it "without any further justification". You are much better with an up to date (4th) edition of McHugh's Annotations, and the Skeleton ...
A. Herz's user avatar
  • 19
1 vote

What does Nuvoletta's disappearance signify in Finnegans Wake?

The section you mentioned actually comes within a larger section called "The Mooks and the Gripes" which is named in a way to evoke the fox and the grapes. The whole section is full of fairy ...
Daniel Brown's user avatar

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