41

It's a nonce word and is used only in Finnegans Wake. Joyce intentionally made it long probably to catch readers' attention and persuade them to read his novel (Finnegans Wake). It's defined by Your Dictionary as: Bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnuk: (nonce) A sound which represents the ...


12

Ahh yes, the impeccable word: bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthur- nuk! only opposed by Shakespeare's honorificabilitudinitatibus and the timelessly delightful supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. Anyways back to your question: It is a biblical word coined in James Joyce's Finnegans Wake which is ...


8

I found some quotes from Wikipedia about how to read it. They seem to suggest that you should appreciate the rhythm more than anything. Eugene Jolas said: Those who have heard Mr. Joyce read aloud from Work in Progress know the immense rhythmic beauty of his technique. It has a musical flow that flatters the ear, that has the organic structure of ...


8

Most of these aren't saying "whore". The one that does is "Hohore", which according to this page is actually "ho whore"; "ho" here is the exclamation. Also, note the r in "hore". The Oxford English Dictionary's earliest attestation for "hoe" (for any spelling without r) meaning "whore" is from the 1964 book Deep down in Jungle: Main who', best girlfriend....


3

I found a quote that may be what you're remembering, or slightly misremembering. It's not from Joyce himself, but I think it's close enough to be worth posting as an answer. It concerns Work in Progress, the title Joyce used to refer to Finnegans Wake before its complete publication, and the idea that only twelve or thirteen people might be able to fully ...


3

I suspect that the ‘Outline of Chapter Contents’ was written by Seamus Deane, who edited the Joyce editions for Penguin in the early 1990s. The evidence I have for this is that the following editions all lack the ‘Outline’: This 1949 Faber & Faber edition. Note that it says “First published in mcmxx […] Reprinted in mcmxlvi, mcmxlviii and mcmxlix”. The ...


2

As I understand it, Nuvoletta ... disappeared in the end of the excerpt. In Finnegans Wake, no one ever disappears, at least not for very long, because they always have to begin again! While the song you are studying misleadingly ends (159.6-10) Then Nuvoletta reflected for the last time in her little long life and she made up all her myriads of drifting ...


1

Tindall is not to be recommended. Too little detail and much of it "without any further justification". You are much better with an up to date (4th) edition of McHugh's Annotations, and the Skeleton Key, or with Rose & O'Hanlons Understanding FW (harder to get). As you have gathered, the passage you refer to is one of many accounts of the marriage of ...


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