24

Kefitzat Haderech is a Jewish phrase that means "contracting the path". Herbert defines Kwisatz Haderach as "the Shortening of the Way" (Dune: Appendix IV), clearly meaning to reference the Hebrew here. As seen in this answer on SFF, a large quantity of names in Dune are inspired by words from Semitic languages such as Hebrew or Arabic.


17

For vowels the letters i, e, a, o, u are used, and (in Sindarin only) y. As far as can be determined the sounds represented by these letters (other than y) were of normal kind, though doubtless many local varieties escape detection. That is, the sounds were approximately those represented by i, e, a, o, u in English machine, were, farther, for, brute, ...


12

If I understand what you are asking right... here is the answer - Tolkien was not the first to use a made up language and in fact making up languages was quite common. These are just the first two examples I found, I am sure there are more out there. In 1516 Thomas More made the Utopian language for his novel Utopia. He even gave a brief sample of this ...


10

Not much. We know very little about the linguistic construction of the Gnommish language. Eoin Colfer is no Tolkien; his novels are valuable more for entertainment than for deep and complex worldbuilding. Gnommish is a spoken language. In-universe, it's not just an enciphered version of English with fancy letters, as the other answers here claim. The fact ...


5

The raven's words are never explicitly translated, but they are referenced later. In Chapter 6, "Hunted", of the same book A Wizard of Earthsea: Hope and mistrust struggled in Ged’s mind as he listened. A wizardly man soon learns that few indeed of his meetings are chance ones, be they for good or for ill. "In what land is the Court of the ...


3

This is two questions: Does a Latvian translation of the book exist? If so, what is the translation of the made-up word Nadsat? Question 1: yes. Mehāniskais apelsīns was translated by Silvija Brice and published by Atēna Publishers in Riga in 1999. The ISBN-10 is 9984635155 and the ISBN-13 is 9789984635156. Question 2: The made-up word Nadsat may not have ...


2

Yes, but not by Adams ... as far as I can tell, anyhow. Unless you count the sequel. As the Wikipedia page for the language says: Linguists, academics, and fans of the original novel have further developed and refined the Lapine language since its 1972 creation.[6][13] Authors, such as Patrick Jemmer (who corresponded briefly with Adams regarding Lapine), ...


2

The closest I've seen is A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess, whose first-person narrator, Alex, narrates the entire novel in NadSat. Nadsat isn't a distinct fictional language, as you ask for, but it is a fictional argot invented by Burgess. Here's a representative quote from Goodreads, which is clearly readable but not fully comprehensible to an English ...


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