40

The book deals with a lot of themes about censorship, so naturally you would think censorship is one of his main points or themes he is trying to convey in the book. Strangely enough, censorship was not what he intended the book to be about. According to Bradbury, the book is about media and how it dumbs down the nation. I wasn't worried about freedom, I ...


11

It's a symbol of how good, useful tools we grant to or accept from our government can quickly and easily become tools of oppression. As an example, some would argue that modern US equivalent of this might be the NSA. Mechanical Hounds were, as Easterly Irk notes, a useful invention, originally. They've found people who might be injured or unconscious. They ...


7

You can make an argument for anything, really. It just depends on whether it's a good argument. I'd argue that the common interpretation of Fahrenheit 451 as being about government censorship isn't a very good interpretation. What fits much better is the one that the author himself intended: Fahrenheit's not about censorship, it's about the moronic ...


6

Montag committed at least one lapse prior to meeting Clarisse, about a year earlier when he encountered an old man in the park. In addition to listening to a poetry reading (not in and of itself a crime, but certainly considered aberrant behaviour) he failed to search the Professor despite being confident that he'd find a book of poetry on the man. They ...


6

The hound represents the government's control and advanced technology. Originally, dogs served the firemen. They sniffed out the injured or weak. However, in this dystopia, the dog has been made into a watchdog of society, punishing those who don't obey the rules set by the government.


5

It isn't, at least not in the form we know it. The society presented in the book is one of leisure, easily consumed entertainment and carelessnes. Any thoughtprovoking material (i.e. books, especially critical or philosophical ones) has been banned, as it might lead to earnest and meaningful thoughts, discussions and questions. Of course the people fail to ...


4

This excerpt: Montag shook his head. He looked at a blank wall. The girl's face was there, really quite beautiful in memory: astonishing, in fact. She had a very thin face like the dial of a small clock seen faintly in a dark room in the middle of a night when you waken to see the time and see the clock telling you the hour and the minute and the second, ...


3

Have you been to a library recently? In olden times, libraries had books. Lots of books. That was how you learned things. When newspapers and magazines came along, libraries added newspapers and magazines. When videotapes and DVDs came along, libraries added videotapes and DVDs. Each time they cut down on their books to make room. When the Internet came ...


2

I wondered about this, but I don't think Beatty has to know. Remember, people can be punished just for seeming different, or being the sort of person who evoke suspicion, in Bradbury's future. On rereading I figured either Beatty was bluffing (sort of like hazing a new fraternity recruit, or just showing his power over Montag,) or it might be a test. ...


2

The context to this quote is very useful. It's from the section when Beatty is telling Montag about the dumbing-down of life over the ages: shorten the books, add pictures, add games constantly, organize sports, cram things full of fluff, nursery to college to nursery: School is shortened [...] Life is immediate Thus the part everything bang; boff, ...


1

To me the censorship angle is there on the surface, but when you look more deeply, if you wanted to argue that it wasn't about censorship, the book itself does support that: He does clearly say in the book that the people slowly stopped caring about books, and most didn't mind the Firemen burning the books. People just wanted to live a life of fast driving ...


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