5

He still can't confess his feelings for her Jay Gatsby idolizes Daisy to an absurd level and yet he is unable to confess his feelings to her. He has set up an elaborate party for her, trying to make everything perfect, but now, when she's here, he can't bring himself to confess his feelings for fear of rejection. Thus, the entire party was a mistake, either ...


5

Here "Her say" means "what she had/wanted to say" (see Merriam-Webster definition 1 for as a noun), which has been "said" (used as past tense of "say"), as she has just spoken it in her last line. An expanded form would thus be "(Having said what she wanted to already)". Since she's finished saying what she ...


3

There's two levels to this. What she "got done" is golfing. “Jordan’s going to play in the tournament tomorrow,” explained Daisy, “over at Westchester.” “Oh—you’re Jordan Baker.” I knew now why her face was familiar—its pleasing contemptuous expression had looked out at me from many rotogravure pictures of the sporting life at Asheville and Hot ...


3

The story was first published under the title ‘His Russet Witch’ in Metropolitan Magazine for February 1921. Fitzgerald changed the title to the more dramatic ‘“O Russet Witch!”’ for the collection Tales of the Jazz Age (1922). This change seems to rule out the possibility that the title is a quotation: it is hard to imagine that Fitzgerald would need two ...


3

It is describing the speaker. She had "her say", something she wanted to bring up, and now it has been said. Something like her drink drunk her words spoken That's all.


2

To “pull the wires” means To manipulate or influence (a person) as if pulling the wires of a puppet; to control (a situation, organization, etc.) from behind the scenes. Oxford English Dictionary. A couple of citations for this sense: I tell you Jerry isn’t given to pulling wires to get what he likes. Beth B. Gilchrist (1917). ‘Cinderella’s Granddaughter’....


2

This is apparently the only place that Fitzgerald uses ellipses in The Great Gatsby if this source is accurate. That author's reading that Nick had a sexual encounter with Mr McKee is not unique. The reading of this as being a homosexual encounter dates back at least to 1977 according to this article in The Millions but that same article points out that this ...


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