21

It seems to have been the editor who proposed the title, and the author didn't like it much. The original suggestion seems to have come from Fitzgerald's editor and friend, Maxwell Perkins: I always thought that "The Great Gatsby" was a suggestive and effective title, -- with only the vaguest knowledge of the book, of course. But anyway, the last thing ...


12

I think this would be an example of synecdoche, a figure of speech where a part of something is used to represent it. Here, the "raw vigor" of the new money society and the "euphemisms" employed by the old money society represent their respective societies. The nouveau riche find themselves restricted and suffocated under the mores and norms of the ...


11

The phrase "that most limited of all specialists" refers to "the well-rounded man" in this sentence. When we refer to a "well-rounded" person, we refer to someone who generally knows a little about a lot of things, and is able to appreciate a lot of things. They're the sort of person that knows who painted the Mona Lisa and perhaps The Ambassadors (if you'...


10

On the surface, Owl Eyes is a perceptive character. He sees things that others miss. In reality, though, he's more easily fooled than anyone. The large glasses, of course, tie him to the Eckleburg billboard. There's a continuous contrast between surface and reality in the book, with the nagging question of how to tell the difference. Bigger glasses? ...


10

The new-money people of West Egg, on the other hand, are more ostentatious about their hedonism. In essence, yes, you have caught the gist of the phrase. Daisy is aware, as is Nick, of the fact that the more conservative cultural mores are in play in West Egg, but the people there are closer to openly breaking free of them, of shrugging them off. There's ...


9

The "old euphemisms" are hinting at the genteel elegance which is supposed to be a hallmark of "old money" — basically, an oligarchic noblesse oblige, a way of behaving which Old Money people lived by and taught to their children. If your family had been wealthy a long time, you knew it, everyone knew it, and there were certain standards to uphold. Flaunting ...


9

Most likely this refers to the number of gears. The phrase "standard shift" nowadays refers to the type of transmission: manual transmission or automatic transmission according to which is considered "standard" in a given context (e.g. manual is generally more common in Europe, automatic in the United States). However, automatic transmission was only ...


6

There is a description of the Fay–Buchanan marriage in chapter 4: In June [1919] she [Daisy Fay] married Tom Buchanan of Chicago with more pomp and circumstance than Louisville ever knew before. He came down with a hundred people in four private cars and hired a whole floor of the Muhlbach Hotel, and the day before the wedding he gave her a string of pearls ...


6

Did Fitzgerald himself come up with the title? I believe so. I disagree with the claim that it is likely that Maxwell Perkins, Fitzgerald's editor, came up with the title. We have the correspondence between Perkins and Fitzgerald, and it's clear from this correspondence that Fitzgerald was unhappy with the title. Also, Perkins is certainly the first person ...


6

The phrase is purposefully biblical and is used to denote Gatsby's inflated but empty ego. First, let's provide a dictionary definition of the unusual word "meretricious". apparently attractive but having no real value. So, the "vast, vulgar and meretricious beauty" is something impressive but ultimately empty. Prior to making this statement, the ...


5

TL;DR: The book doesn’t say, so you’re going to have to imagine it for yourself. I looked on fanfiction.net, but no-one there has written a version of this scene. There are a few clues on which you might build your version of events. In chapter 8: And all the time something within her was crying for a decision. She wanted her life shaped now, immediately—...


5

There's no great mystery to this: it literally means what it says. Newly-dug graves are often covered with canvas to protect them from the rain. Otherwise, the dug earth would turn to mud. This is especially true before the coffin is lowered into the hole. Not only is the expanse of bare earth greater, but making the hole blend in with the green grass makes ...


5

You should first ask who cares "in this heat whose flushed lips he kissed, whose head made damp the pajama pocket over his heart!" Who could the narrator know cares? The only person the narrator could know this about is the narrator himself. And if the narrator is talking about himself, it's a rhetorical statement; he is really reminding himself that he ...


5

He still can't confess his feelings for her Jay Gatsby idolizes Daisy to an absurd level and yet he is unable to confess his feelings to her. He has set up an elaborate party for her, trying to make everything perfect, but now, when she's here, he can't bring himself to confess his feelings for fear of rejection. Thus, the entire party was a mistake, either ...


5

Here "Her say" means "what she had/wanted to say" (see Merriam-Webster definition 1 for as a noun), which has been "said" (used as past tense of "say"), as she has just spoken it in her last line. An expanded form would thus be "(Having said what she wanted to already)". Since she's finished saying what she ...


4

TL;DR: Scott Fitzgerald is referring to Spring and Autumn. The "two changes of the year" are the transition from dormancy to growth (corresponding to Spring), and from maturity to dormancy (corresponding to Autumn/Fall). Some countries define the start of these two seasons as the respective equinoxes. In a sense this is a somewhat arbitrary assignment, as ...


4

I think you are attributing the handle to the wrong object. The cap covers the entry hole to the gasoline tank in the car. The handle is used to dispense the gasoline from the pump. In this context Pump means the above ground parts of the Gas Stations fuel tank. This image from The American Oil & Gas Historical Society should make it clearer. ...


4

The paragraphs in the question follow a description of a heatwave: The next day was broiling, almost the last, certainly the warmest, of the summer. As my train emerged from the tunnel into sunlight, only the hot whistles of the National Biscuit Company broke the simmering hush at noon. The straw seats of the car hovered on the edge of combustion [...] The ...


4

It's possibility 4. These are dialog, and they are undoubtedly meant to convey a pronunciation of have without the /h/. You could also spell this pronunciation: if we'd've raised the blinds we'd've seen daylight. Note that there are other mistakes in this dialog. The second 'd in the second sentence is also incorrect grammar (of a form that is quite common ...


4

This Cambridge edition, with explanatory notes by James L W West III and Lynn Setzer specifically notes that although Margherita di Savoia was a real person, Queen of Italy from 1878 to 1900 and Queen Dowager thereafter, Cardinal Vitori was a fictitious character. This does not completely rule out his character being in some way based on a real person. ...


4

The story is set in Baltimore. Just for reference, here's the text of the short story, entitled "Esquire" (from the Afternoon of an Author collection) and dated to August 1936. The biggest chunk of information about the story's setting comes near the beginning: "Yes, I certainly need to get out," he thought. "I'd like to drive down the Shenandoah Valley,...


3

It's "deliberate" bad grammar to portray uneducated people who are not part of the elite. So their using "would of" in place of "would have" is part of the "characterization" of such people. At some level, they don't really belong in a novel with people like Nick, Daisy, Jordan, or even Gatsby. Except that they were "hangers on," Myrtle as the mistress of ...


3

Well, first, the whole beginning of your quote is basically saying: Cody was rich, but as he was getting older and presumably had a soft spot for women or wasn't super clever, many women tried to marry him for his money. Ramifications means consequences. Madame de Maintenon is actually a historical figure. She was the second wife of King Louis XIV of ...


3

In Chapter 1 we read “Why candles?” objected Daisy frowning. She snapped them out with her fingers. To ‘snap out’ a candle you extinguish the flame by literally snapping your fingers next to it as described and shown on this website and video. As to their becoming ‘accidental’ it may mean that the importance of their interactions were diminished from ...


3

There's two levels to this. What she "got done" is golfing. “Jordan’s going to play in the tournament tomorrow,” explained Daisy, “over at Westchester.” “Oh—you’re Jordan Baker.” I knew now why her face was familiar—its pleasing contemptuous expression had looked out at me from many rotogravure pictures of the sporting life at Asheville and Hot ...


3

It is describing the speaker. She had "her say", something she wanted to bring up, and now it has been said. Something like her drink drunk her words spoken That's all.


3

The story was first published under the title ‘His Russet Witch’ in Metropolitan Magazine for February 1921. Fitzgerald changed the title to the more dramatic ‘“O Russet Witch!”’ for the collection Tales of the Jazz Age (1922). This change seems to rule out the possibility that the title is a quotation: it is hard to imagine that Fitzgerald would need two ...


2

"Abortive" means "failing to produce results," so it denotes a sorrow, probably short-lived, that doesn't cause the person to change. Likewise a "shortwinded" person quickly loses his breath on exercise, and therefore an elation is "shortwinded" if it ends quickly because it's exhausted. Since Gatsby is dead by the end of the novel -- and the reference is ...


2

Compare Tom and George (Wilson). This can be done with a Venn Diagram. Draw two big circles on the page. One side will be marked "Tom". The other side will be marked "George". The two circles must overlap. On Tom's side, you write Tom's characteristics. What does he look like? How does he behave? What is his personality like? On George's side, you write ...


2

Daisy (Fay) Buchanan was a well-meaning, but ultimately weak and indecisive woman from a wealthy family. Modern critics might characterize as a Stepford Wife. Her main problem is that she doesn't seem to "take responsibility" for her actions (even though she appears not to mean any harm). In Nick's opinion, "They were careless people, Tom and Daisy – ...


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