11 votes
Accepted

Explain the grammar of "That not one fleecy lamb ..." in Keats' "Endymion"

The main verb here is "pass'd", and what you're missing is the now rather archaic (and in this case divided by an intervening phrase) usage of the phrase "not one but". I can't ...
user avatar
  • 64.5k
5 votes

Explain the grammar of "That not one fleecy lamb ..." in Keats' "Endymion"

The difficult word here is “but”, which Keats uses in the following sense. (All definitions in this answer come from the Oxford English Dictionary.) but, conj., 10.e.(b) With the pronominal subject ...
user avatar
  • 41.7k
4 votes
Accepted

Meaning of the noun 'sweet' in Keats' "Endymion"

Keats is fond of rare and archaic senses of words, but I think that all the senses here are guessable, if you think carefully about what the word needs to mean for the line to make sense in its ...
user avatar
  • 41.7k
2 votes
Accepted

What are the "lovely tales" in Keats' "Endymion"?

Lines 1–33 of ‘Endymion’ form an introduction to the story, which starts at line 34: Therefore, ’tis with full happiness that I Will trace the story of Endymion. The only way to understand the ...
user avatar
  • 41.7k
2 votes

What did Keats mean by “it is not without a feeling of regret that I make it public” in his preface to "Endymion"?

As an explanation, it's worth including the next few lines of the introduction as well: What manner I mean, will be quite clear to the reader, who must soon perceive great inexperience, immaturity, ...
user avatar
  • 19.9k
1 vote
Accepted

Keats' views on beauty

The question asks, ‘Was Keats ever criticized for standardizing generic beauty?’ and the answer is ‘yes—indeed, he was criticized along these lines by his own fiancée, Fanny Brawne!’ The evidence for ...
user avatar
  • 41.7k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible