24

She's dead. As Poe writes himself in his Philosophy of Composition, an essay about competent poetic writing based on his own analysis of The Raven (full text available here): I had now gone so far as the conception of a Raven, the bird of ill-omen, monotonously repeating the one word "Nevermore" at the conclusion of each stanza in a poem of melancholy ...


22

TL;DR: There have been several major accusations that Poe plagiarized The Raven from a number of different works, many in other languages. However, those claims have little to no evidence to back them up, and they have been dismissed by most as being attempts at attention. We have no reliable evidence of any sort that Poe committed plagiarism here. In the ...


20

TL;DR: There are a few connections between Poe's works, generally via one story being directly or indirectly referenced in another one published later. However, there are two instances of multiple stories having the same universe, and sometimes the same characters: A Predicament and How to Write a Blackwood Article, and The Landscape-Garden, The Domain of ...


15

LENORE IS DEAD. The following confirms that Lenore is dead: The narrator expresses grief for the "lost Lenore" Lost is defined as "something that cannot be recovered." Lenore cannot be recovered, proving that she is dead. The angels have named a rare and radiant maiden that of Lenore. This is an obvious reference to Lenore being dead due to the mention ...


14

Commentators like William Giraldi, The Annotated Poe, point out that this refers to Jeremiah 8:22: Is there no balm in Gilead; is there no physician there? why then is not the health of the daughter of my people recovered? Wikipedia says that the Balm of Gilead, speaking figuratively, is a "universal cure," and Les Harding writes: To ask the question ...


11

I don't believe the Raven symbolizes death at all, but rather life, in grief of having to live after a loved one is dead. As Poe himself put it in his essay Philosophy of Composition: The reader begins now to regard the Raven as emblematical — but it is not until the very last line of the very last stanza, that the intention of making him emblematical ...


8

Stevenson's admission of the earlier stories and authors he'd plagiarised borrowed ideas from comes in My First Book - his little-known preface to Treasure Island, first published in McClure's Magazine in September 1894. First Stevenson acknowledges very readily some minor ideas and motifs taken from other writers: It is not to be wondered at, for stolen ...


7

It was his crazy, guilty conscience. As well as the quote you mention, in which the murderer makes sure that the old man is dead by holding his hand to his heart for "many minutes" without feeling a beat, there's also this in the next paragraph, from when he's hiding the old man's body: First of all I dismembered the corpse. I cut off the head and the ...


6

The cask of Amontillado is the description of a murder by the murder himself, Montresor. As you have noticed, information about the motive for the crime is very scarce in this short story. There is no such thing as a third party in the story, who could express some kind of neutral point of view. Or more specifically, there is no external view except the ...


6

Hortulus Animae (or better in French) is the usual answer. See, for instance, section 3 of this essay: Just as one need not know precisely which "certain German book" Poe is referring to in order to proceed to the second paragraph and beyond—again, we do not learn the identity of this book until the story's last sentence—so one does not need to be able ...


5

Enhancing the creepy feeling Describing the weather and external conditions certainly does this effectively. The whole story has a masterfully built atmosphere of oppressive dread - not a dread linked to fear of some specific event, but a deep, existential disquiet. The countenance and behaviour of Roderick Usher, the mostly behind-the-scenes sickness and ...


3

Most of the authors you list belong to a genre known as Weird Fiction. The Wikipedia article on the genre has four out of the five authors you name under its list of notable contributors and names Poe as the founder of the genre. The missing author is Guy de Maupassant. But given that he has a two-volume collection available entitled "Collected Supernatural ...


2

unless I count "many a" as 2 syllables (MA-nya) and curious as 2 (CU-rious). This doesn't sound too unnatural to me. (Disclaimer: I speak with a British accent, which Poe didn't.) Let's check how it fits with the meter of the rest of the first verse of the poem: Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and ...


2

No, there seems to be no evidence that Poe was taphephobic. This answer relies heavily on the master's thesis Taphephobia in Edgar Allan Poe's Collection of Gothic Tales: A New Historicist Study of 19th Century America's Most Prevalent Fear, written by Salma Layouni as part of her MA degree at the University of Sousse, Tunisia. If you really want to know ...


1

A larger excerpt would give us more context (I don't recognize the story in question), but I think you're reading it correctly: The man was entertaining and despicable at the same time. They give him a hearty welcome because he's entertaining. How entertaining? Almost half as entertaining as he is contemptible. In other words, he's so contemptible that ...


1

One thing that immediately struck me on reading the poem is how the two stanzas seem to form an argument and a counterargument. The first stanza ends with the assertion "All that we see or seem / Is but a dream within a dream", while the second ends by questioning that assertion: "Is all that we see or seem / But a dream within a dream?" I interpret the ...


1

The human body can survive for a pretty long time without food or water. A famous example, Mahatma Gandhi, survived 21 days with only small sips of water. However, that's with a bit of water. According to Scientific American, the human body can last (on average) around a hundred hours without water, at the far end. However, this depends on the temperature,...


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