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152

His brain sends a message to his ears, which lock him to the top of the doghouse. Charles Schulz seems to have addressed this question only once, in the 25th anniversary book "The Peanuts Jubilee". I haven't found this anywhere online (including the Peanuts Wikia) so I thought I'd upload it and share it here. The more Snoopy moved into his life of ...


69

Bill Watterson has spoken about this on a number of occasions. The very short answer is that his strips obey the rule of funny, that Hobbes is a toy when it suits the story for him to be a toy and real when it suits the story that he's real (for example in the strip below where Hobbes ties Calvin up in a way that he couldn't have accomplished on his own). ...


47

It's intentionally ambiguous; we don't know. In his book Calvin and Hobbes Tenth Anniversary, he says: The so-called 'gimmick' of my strip - the two versions of Hobbes - is sometimes misunderstood. I don't think of Hobbes as a doll that miraculously comes to life when Calvin's around. Neither do I think of Hobbes as the product of Calvin's imagination. The ...


42

It was a decision by the artist, Dave Gibbons. He has said so in his Twitter, in response to a thread discussing the origin of the 9-panel grid: Actually, I chose the nine panel grid and sold it to Alan. Gave him great control & its restriction challenged me to compose more creatively Dave Gibbons on Twitter In Watching the Watchmen, Gibbons ...


27

I think the answer is probably no. The following is a quote by Alan Moore about his novel Jerusalem (emphasis mine): I like that idea because when we talk about history we talk about the history of church of state and maybe a dozen families. What about the rest of us? Weren't we doing anything while all that was going on, or were we minor players in ...


25

My answer is no by his own design. My understanding is that he deliberately created a universe where all of his actions stay fixed, while other people have some free will. Note that my answer is based on Before Watchmen comics, and very little on Alan Moore's words. But firstly, he does not see himself as Jon Osterman anymore. Remember the line from ...


21

First of all, let me just point out two things which it may be useful to bear in mind when considering how seriously to take this answer: whether I'm overanalysing or underanalysing here. Firstly, some of the choices of animals are significant. It's not completely random; the author spent some considerable time thinking about which animals to use to ...


21

Graphic novel is a sub-category of comic books (which are, in turn, as subset of comics). For me (and hopefully for some other people out there), graphic novels represent a more coherent, complete, and mature subset of the comic book industry (and thus my comment on a relevant meta). This website calls comic books "periodicals", but some graphic ...


16

This is a Foxtrot strip from October 14, 2012. Paige: Can you make my pancakes heart-shaped? Roger: Not a problem! Peter: Can you make my pancakes football-shaped? Roger: You got it! Jason: Can you make my pancakes heptagon-shaped and tile them on the plate in a Poincaré disk model of the hyperbolic plane? You can make as many as you want, by the way. Peter:...


14

As it has been suggested that it would be useful to identify all of the Allusions in the quoted piece, I've edited this answer to include further information. And made some discoveries along the way. Regular, the romin - insulting the kottage injins The start of this extract begins with a reference to Marcus Atilius Regulus, the roman who defeated the ...


12

The first time the Rupert Annuals repeated a story was in 1953. But before the year I remember (2006), there were only seven years in which old stories were repeated (1953, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1988), and the only time any story from later than 1940 was repeated was for the 50th anniversary special (1986), which made a point of containing one story ...


12

Because he doesn't. Or maybe he does, just a little bit, because Gaiman sort of looks like a whole bunch of other dudes (and dudettes) who influenced Morpheus' looks. Well, at least his face hasn't been explicitly stated to be based on Gaiman's. Reading through canon (that is, word of gods - people who actually worked on The Sandman) sources, I couldn't ...


11

I found it: Apparently this is from the book Build a Better Life by Stealing Office Supplies: Dogbert's Big Book of Business - many thanks to @Carmeister for knowing this! How I found it: a Google image search for comic strip unix "clothes say" about you (note the quotes) led me to this page. Having found the image, I tried searching for an exact quote but ...


10

No, it has nothing to do with Lem's novel. It's a play on the famous trademark originated by the Gramophone Company (and later used by EMI) in the UK and used by Victor (and later RCA) in the USA. Take a look at the context: Tamla and Trojan are both record labels known for releasing music by (respectively) African-American or African-British artists. (...


9

It does apply to comics, although comics really have no direct correlation to a film director. The term is applied to any comic that is a reprint of any particular issue with added commentary by the writer or editor, script pages or production related artwork. Quote from Comicvine: "Director's Cut comics are special release issues with added content ...


9

It was a decision by the letterer, Todd Klein. As he explains in The Sandman Companion, it was supposed to reflect her fluent, shifting nature: Delirium was a different challenge. "Her lettering constantly changes in size, shape, and slant, wobbling in out, to indicate that she's always on the verge of madness," Klein says. "Her balloons also ...


9

Quite conveniently, Neil Gaiman answered this in his interview with Hy Bender for The Sandman Companion. In chapter 4, which is devoted to Doll's House, Hy asks Neil whether he was inspired by anything in particular for this story: HB: The first story proper, "Tales in the Sand", reads like a true African fairy tale. Given its authentic feel, I ...


7

You have seen that the viewers' perception of Endless is based on individual expectations. For instance, Dream appears as a black short-haired man to Nada, while he usually looks like a pale white messy haired man (not like Neil Gaiman at all) But that's not all. The Endless are different from all the other entities in the sense they are truly endless. ...


7

I'd like to address the pig metaphor specifically, cause obviously (I'm Polish) it caused a lot of heated discussions in my country. The book is largely about racism/nationalism so to the extent Spiegelman doesn't support racist or nationalist ideas himself I guess we shouldn't treat his choices - whatever they are - as his own views on the nations ...


7

Probably some MySpace blog page(s) which are no longer available. This comic was published on 11 January 2008. Unfortunately the Wayback Machine doesn't seem to list results of Google searches. I went hunting around the internet and found a couple of leads: according to this forum post, on 12 January 2008: I think I found the original 2 results of the ...


7

Evidence For this answer, I considered all the books until Asterix in Belgium, i.e., all books with contributions from both, Uderzo and Goscinny. Since I only have the German editions, I won’t provide direct quotes. Page counts refer to the ones in the panels (usually at the bottom left) and should be independent of the edition. A: with potion This ...


7

The charcoal connection is found with the ‘Bougnats of Paris’. From France écotours: in the 18th century, the agricultural crisis forced thousands of French countrymen to leave their homes in search of work. The Auvergne people left the volcanic soil of their homeland for the capital. There, the new Parisians built a community where they became known as “...


7

No. Asterix is very far from any drug culture, and from methamphetamine usage during war. Magic potions are older than print. They appear in Greek mythology, for example (Jason puts the dragon to sleep with a potion, Circe turns men into swine with a potion, not to mention love potions). I can't name a potion that grants strength or invincibility, but I put ...


6

18 issues total. (I looked up full sets of the comic) The last was written in October of 1969.


6

A graphic novel is longer and is usually a single story; comic books are shorter and are often multiple stories. From Dictionary.com: Comic book a magazine with one or more comic strips. Graphic novel a novel in the form of comic strips. So, for instance, Bone is a graphic novel, and The Essential Calvin and Hobbes is a comic book. You can see the ...


6

I've just finished reading V for Vendetta in its collected trade paperback edition. At the end, there is a short essay by Alan Moore, titled "Behind the Painted Smile", which explains the creative process behind the book - how it was conceived and how it was executed. Initially, Alan Moore wanted to write a similarly themed comic about a guy called "The ...


6

The three women is a recurring motif in stories and mythology. The fates, the graces, the furies in Greek mythology, the norns in Norse mythology, Shakespeare's weird sisters, etc. In The Sandman, Gaiman recurrently hints that the three-in-one are both the fates and the furies. Perhaps the three - the mother, the maiden, the crone, also stands for some ...


6

Her Wikia page says this about the colors of the speech bubbles: Todd Klein, the series' letterer, draws her speech as a scrawl, against a multi-colored background, sometimes the background color will match the mood she is in (red for anger, blue and green for calm, etc.). They don't, as far as I can tell, have a citation for this claim. It appears to be ...


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