9

Tolkien never explained the choice to leave Sauron off-stage, or at least he did not do so in the published letters. But I can see three ways in which the decision makes sense. First, The Lord of the Rings is written largely from the down-to-earth point of view of the hobbit characters, a narrative strategy that Tolkien recognized was necessary to reach a ...


6

I have found two possible explanations for this. Unfortunately, we are unlikely to ever know which - if either - is correct. 1: It's a Punctuation Error According to W. Edward Farrison in his essay Horatio's Report to Hamlet (Modern Language Notes, June 1957) it is a printing mistake. He notes that in early editions of the play, the mark after "once" ...


5

The Witches are supernatural in character and Satanic. They delivered a self-fulfilling prophecy to tempt Macbeth into willingly committing evil deeds to secure his soul. A common motif in mythology is that of the three Fates. Greek and Roman, Irish and Norse legend all have versions of these figures with each of the women representing past, present and ...


3

It seems so. The most compelling evidence I've found (thanks to the Stoicism community on Reddit) is the following passage, quoting one of the Fox's lessons: "Orual," she said, "you make me think I have learned the Fox's lessons better than you. Have you forgotten what we are to say to ourselves every morning? 'Today I shall meet cruel men, cowards and ...


2

You might find this of interest: https://thenovelsmithy.com/character-arcs-flat-arcs/ Nausicaa's story is essentially that of a Messiah figure. It's less about her learning and growing as a character, and more about her struggling to save the people she meets and demonstrating the correct path to them. It's a very tricky plot to pull off well --- can easily ...


2

It's not entirely certain that Syme was vaporised. We know only that he is no longer around for Winston to talk with. If Syme were still useful in his work, or in something related, the Party simply could have reassigned him to another bureau and then made it look like he had been removed from all records to which Winston had access. With Syme gone Winston ...


2

There's no real explanation online (not surprisingly) so here's my attempt at it: The overall theme of "The Prescription" seems to deal with social status and pride of an individual. This is illustrated by Dr. Mehmet's comment where he states, "‘I decline to accept you as a colleague, Alexander Zarifi.’" as well as "‘Your [Alecco's] word is not ...


2

In answering this question, I cannot do better than to quote the analysis of David Lake: I will now prove that ‘Jules’ must be taken as Wells, and no-one else. There are at least nine points of contact, including a genuine semi-quotation from a book by Wells placed in Jules’s mouth. I will first demonstrate the similarities, and only later point out how ...


1

What's the purpose of this description, considering how utterly despicable and cynical he appears to be later in the story? Two purposes: 1) Bateman didn't start utterly despicable and cynical. There might have been goodness in his heart that got twisted and lost later. 2) Even evil has standards trope (warning, tvtropes link!). He might be cynical, he ...


1

There's a useful observation in Simone Weils Gravity and Grace, edited Gustave Thibon from her notebooks, which might help your confusion on this: Literature and morality: Imaginary evil is romantic and varied; real evil is gloomy, monotonous, barren and boring. Imaginary good is boring; real good is always new, marvelous, intoxicating. Therefore '...


1

What would the novel's ending have been like if there was no Liza-Lu? I think she is unnecessarily thrust upon the readers' sympathy. Without Liza-Lu marrying Angel the story would be more elevating and intense. What I can read under the surface is that Tess never got rid of the idea that she is impure, and, therefore, unfit for Angel. Hence, before she ...


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