42

It's subtle and perhaps a bit of a stretch, but I think we can infer that Snape likes Draco for a similar reason to why he dislikes Harry. He dislikes Harry because Harry's father treated him badly at school. And he likes Draco because Draco's father treated him well at school. I'm mostly getting this from the following passage in the chapter "The Prince's ...


31

In terms of explicit confirmation, the answer is a very solid no. At no point did any character, nor the omniscient narrator, identify Dumbledore's sexuality in simple terms. Signs and portents. Various writers have identified incidents and passages that might act as subtle indicators toward his sexuality. Note that all of these were spotted post-facto ...


27

As someone who rather likes the totally non-canonical idea of gay Edmund, there is really no textual evidence to support this idea and you are right to point out that it is extremely unlikely that Lewis intended the character to be gay. There's not even much of what most people would consider obvious gay subtext. We don't see Edmund longingly describe the ...


27

The single strongest piece of evidence is surely this, from A Naval Treaty: "Thank you. I have no doubt I can get details from Forbes. The authorities are excellent at amassing facts, though they do not always use them to advantage. What a lovely thing a rose is!" [Holmes] walked past the couch to the open window, and held up the drooping stalk of a ...


20

This is referencing the plot of the second chapter of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain. In this chapter, Tom tricks the other boys into doing his work for him: “What do you call work?” “Why, ain’t that work?” Tom resumed his whitewashing, and answered carelessly: “Well, maybe it is, and maybe it ain’t. All I know, is, it suits ...


18

The most related trope would probably be Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass, when a minor character with no apparent skills turns out to be a super-secret ninja-assasin in disguise. A subtrope of this is Took a Level in Badass, which is seems to be pretty much what you're looking for. This is when a character pretty much suddenly develops a cool power, though ...


12

Some parts of the text suggest she was thirteen ... I found this article, which summarises an analysis by Russian sexologist A. Kotrovsky and columnist E. Tchernych and concludes that Tatiana was probably only thirteen: Pushkin uses the word otrokovitsa. This hard-to-pronounce Russian word is usually translated as maiden but in Pushkin’s time otrok (male)...


11

JKR has stated this: Sybill's first name is a homonym of 'Sibyl', which was a female clairvoyant in ancient times. My American editor wanted me to use 'Sibyl', but I preferred my version, because while it keeps the reference to the august clairvoyants of old, it is really no more than a variant the [sic] unfashionable female name 'Sybil'. Professor ...


11

I believe Lewis meant readers to assume the Scrubb family were adherents of scientism. There's only a small amount of evidence for this in Dawn Treader itself, but it makes sense in light of his expressed views on scientism in his other work. This interpretation also lends itself to a straightforward reading of Dawn Treader as the journey of an atheist to ...


10

Dictionary definition of Epilepsy: A neurological disorder marked by sudden recurrent episodes of sensory disturbance, loss of consciousness, or convulsions, associated with abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Let's have a look at Simon: [...] the choir huddled into line and stood there swaying in the sun [...] one of the boys flopped on his ...


10

If we're interpreting the scene that Hamlet wrote about in his answer (I haven't read the books recently enough to recall whether Regulus' Quidditch position is mentioned elsewhere), I have another, perhaps simpler explanation. I think that Regulus' position is mentioned, specifically noticed by Harry, to create some form of kinship or connection between ...


10

The author describes the novel as having a sort of external third-person viewpoint ... I found an interview with Neil Gaiman in which he says that Shadow isn't like most point-of-view characters: we don't get inside his head much, but rather experience events together with him. I actually wrote the entire first chapter in the first person. That was my ...


9

The novel is intended to be somewhat of a dark comedy with levels of illogical reasoning. It is a satire on the yuppie culture of the mid 1980's. The "take away" that I got from the novel is the absurdity of consumerism and how it can not only shape someone's identity, but entirely consume it. There are several reasons why Patrick Bateman spends an ...


9

Lauren Ipsum's answer is correct, as far as the meaning in the play itself goes, but it's also worth noting that Shakespeare's portrayal of Theseus and Hippolyta was based on a much older story. There are many variations of this story in different retellings of Greek mythology. Sometimes Theseus marries Hippolyta, sometimes another Amazon woman; sometimes ...


9

Tolkien never explained the choice to leave Sauron off-stage, or at least he did not do so in the published letters. But I can see three ways in which the decision makes sense. First, The Lord of the Rings is written largely from the down-to-earth point of view of the hobbit characters, a narrative strategy that Tolkien recognized was necessary to reach a ...


8

SPOILERS AHEAD! This answer may contain spoilers including hints to the major plot points of the book; sprinkled all over. References: all Beria facts below are basically from Russian Beria Wiki page unless otherwise stated. First, political parallels. Don Reba's role in the state. His role in the book was described by many as "the grey cardinal" - ...


8

Aside from the debate over whether Atticus had a progressive view on race that Hamlet raised, the answer is no because they are two different Atticus Finches. In this answer, it is pointed out that Lee focused more on social tension in To Kill A Mockingbird than in Go Set A Watchman and therefore it is clear that the purpose of the novels is different. Also, ...


8

On the surface, Owl Eyes is a perceptive character. He sees things that others miss. In reality, though, he's more easily fooled than anyone. The large glasses, of course, tie him to the Eckleburg billboard. There's a continuous contrast between surface and reality in the book, with the nagging question of how to tell the difference. Bigger glasses? ...


8

If you google "algy met a bear" you will get thousands of hits on the traditional "Algy met a bear, the bear met Algy. The bear was bulgy, the bulge was Algy". If you look up pre-1940 bulgy bear in Google books you get hits, such as this one in Everybody's Magazine with some version of a bear meeting Benjy, with predictable results. Not that our Narnian ...


8

Hippolyta is queen of the Amazons. (You may be more familiar with her as Wonder Woman's mother; she's the third woman from the left, next to Diana, in this photo.) Amazons are known mythologically for being fierce warriors. To woo (court, date, interest) a warrior, you might spar, or fight. Theseus is saying that instead of courting her with flowers and ...


8

Introduction Shakespeare took the characters of Theseus and Hippolyta from his sources, most likely Plutarch’s biography of Theseus and Chaucer’s Knight’s Tale. But Shakespeare uses these characters in his own story, which does not correspond closely to Greek mythology. In the myth, Theseus, king of Athens, fought the Amazons and abducted an Amazon woman (...


7

According to this NYT Article, Steinbeck's wife Elaine asked him this very question. His answer was: "For one good reason. She's not a person, she's a symbol. She has no function, except to be a foil – and a danger to Lennie." The article was written by Jay Parini, who also wrote a biography about Steinbeck. Since there are no references in the article, ...


7

Note that the realization that the characters are their own tormentors is made clear quite early in the play: INEZ: It's obvious what they're after— an economy of man-power— or devil-power, if you prefer. The same idea as in the cafeteria, where customers serve themselves. ESTELLE: Whatever do you mean? INEZ: I mean that each of us will ...


7

At one point in the book (page 59 of the Kindle edition, in chapter 4) Drawlight states: He had an old uncle called Haythornthwaite who died and left him a world of money. Although there is no indication in the book as to whether Drawlight is telling the truth. He is, after all, something of a gossip. It does however seem that his wealth is inherited. ...


7

There are multiple instances of "slouching" being associated with Eton: Anthony Powell's description of the "world-famous" slouch of Eton: A boy of fifteen was walking slowly along the far side of the road with one hand in his pocket and the other supporting a pile of books, which rested like a field-marshal's baton against his thigh. His top hat ...


7

The Novel (1911) From Chapter 14 of Peter Pan and Wendy: To tell poor Smee that they thought him lovable! Hook itched to do it, but it seemed too brutal. Instead, he revolved this mystery in his mind: why do they find Smee lovable? He pursued the problem like the sleuth-hound that he was. If Smee was lovable, what was it that made him so? A terrible ...


7

Although Aslan was more of an immediate presence to Narnia than the Emperor, he and his father worked in perfect unity. The Emperor was often referred to as "Aslan's great Father, the Emperor-over-the-sea" and other such titles. He was greatly respected by his son and all who honoured the Lion. [Wikipedia] I do feel not the the charge of deism can ...


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