9

Yes there are, but they are minor. This is exactly the feeling Joseph Heller wanted to provoke. He both intentionally and by 'planned accident' planted anachronisms in the story, and there are some real mistakes as well. The last category is small though, as you noted. The story takes place during WW2. But it was never intended as 'a realistic novel about ...


7

"There is only one catch" refers to that particular situation. The previous lines describe a character Orr, who should be grounded (prevented from flying). Which he's entitled to be, on the grounds that it would be crazy to continue flying. All he has to do is ask... but that would imply that he was sane, and thus sane enough to fly. "Catch-22" is the name ...


7

It may be that he didn't: that this is purely coincidental. Heller had long nurtured an ambition to be a novelist and was working as an advertising copywriter when he began Catch-22. The inspiration came to him in a flash and was, pretty much, the exact sentence that he used to open the novel: "It was love at first sight. The first time he saw the ...


6

I believe, based on the rest of the book, that Yossarian's love for the Chaplain is, most likely, romantic. Whether intentionally or not, Heller wrote Yossarian exhibiting attraction to men multiple times after the opening line. Many of the characters are described, from Yossarian's perspective, as attractive or handsome, including his tentmate Orr" "Orr was ...


5

The central point of this skit is, of course, to illustrate that the Colonels are ill-educated "fools": neither has heard of one of the most famous poets of the 20th century. But any famous poet would do for that: why Eliot? The biggest reason simply seems to be that Heller, the author of Catch-22, was a fan. Heller taught English at college, and Eliot ...


4

Unless I'm missing something, after sifting through Google for awhile I haven't been able to discover any other usages of the term other than in the book. Even searches of Google Scholar and various academic journals and databases don't show any results (other than in articles about - or explicitly referring to - Catch-22). That being said, I haven't been ...


2

Three of the most important reasons appear to be a) the fact that he was dead b) the fact that most of the bureaucrats evidently hadn't heard of him (based on the fact that CID men come looking for him) and c) the fact that he was a major literary figure. Point a) is important to the irony - if Major Major signs his name with the name of a living person, it ...


2

From Containment Culture: American Narratives, Postmodernism, and the Atomic Age, by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Professor of Literature Alan Nadel: If the authority for offices of command relies on null sets, perhaps the exemplary null set in the novel is Major Major Major Major. Even his name is an empty sign, signifying not authority but the name ...


1

One possible answer is that he simply doesn't think about that - that's part of the irony. He doesn't know exactly why he wants to live for a long time, just that he does, and that intentional boredom is (supposedly) one way to do that. The author is deliberately causing the character to behave in an absurd manner. A major theme in the text is the characters'...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible