4

Neither. Coleridge is referring to his own reservations about some of Wordsworth's poems. The context makes this clear: A friend whose talents I hold in the highest respect, but whose judgment and strong sound sense I have had almost continued occasion to revere, making the usual complaints to me concerning both the style and subjects of Mr. Wordsworth's ...


4

TL;DR: Coleridge means the cause of the criticism of the poetry of Southey, Wordsworth, and himself, which he believes was Wordsworth’s preface to Lyrical Ballads. The background to this passage is the critical reaction to the work of Robert Southey, William Wordsworth, and Coleridge himself. He says that the critics wrongly identified these poets as “a new ...


3

The sentence is part of a letter addressed to Coleridge that the poet cites in its entirety near the end of Chapter XIII of Biographia Literaria. In that chapter, Coleridge discusses his theory of the imagination; these thoughts were part of a longer essay that Coleridge planned to publish as the introduction to a volume of his poems. The author of the ...


2

We can reconstruct, I think, what the story must have been, from Coleridge’s brief précis of it. Perhaps it was something like this: A painter was present at an exhibition of his works and overheard a spectator say, “This picture has too many black spots.” The painter was mortified and worked all night to correct the picture, but on the next day the same ...


2

The publication date of the Biographia (1817) made me wonder if this was anything to do with early photography. It turns out that Thomas Wedgwood was carrying out early experiments with sensitised leather and paper, creating what were then known as 'shadow pictures'. His friend Humphry Davy wrote and published in 1802, in the Journal of the Royal ...


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