6

Good question, interesting to research. Short answer: Green got it from Layamon. Green says in his Author's Note: I have gone on to make use of the pseudo-history of Geoffrey of Monmouth, and the verse chronicle of Layamon. These have given me a few ideas and details for Book One - but in essentials it is almost entirely Malory,... I had previously ...


6

There is indeed a resonance with Norse mythology. In Völuspá, stanza 39 according to Codex Regius, or 24 according to Hauksbók (there are otherwise only variations of tense between them in this stanza), we are told of a giantess in an eastern forest, giving birth to a brood of wolves: The giantess old in Ironwood sat, In the east, and bore ...


3

The edition I own of Le Morte d'Arthur is the Penguin Classics version in two volumes: Image source: AbeBooks I'd highly recommend it for someone who's accustomed to reading English literature with old-fashioned turns of phrase (from Shakespeare to the various 19th-century authors or even Tolkien) but not necessarily with archaic, obsolete, or inconsistent ...


2

There are two versions of Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur: the text as printed by Caxton in 1485, from which I believe the Penguin edition is derived, and the "Winchester Manuscript" text, not printed until 1947. Apparently this was the text as it left Malory's hand; Caxton used it in preparing his version. My copy of the latter, in the Oxford Standard ...


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