11

According to Wikipedia: The phrase first appears in writing in Antoine Galland's Les Mille et une nuits (1704–1717) as Sésame, ouvre-toi (English, "Sesame, open!").[1] No earlier oral or written version of the story is known in any language. In the Dutch versions I know, it was "Sesam, open u!" ("Sesam, open yourself!") From its apparently French origin, ...


11

This blog post gives a very interesting possible origin for the phrase Open Sesame. It says that the Arabic word simsim, in addition to meaning sesame, is also a rare literary word for gate. Thus, the original French translation of sésame, ouvre-toi would correspond in Arabic to either gate, open thyself or sesame, open thyself. Ali Baba's brother-in-law, ...


10

Dante was probably influenced and inspired by various Muslim sources, including the Kitab al-Miraj, but the similarities are not strong enough to claim plagiarism. This conjecture dates from 1919 and was first proposed by Miguel Asín Palacios, a Spanish priest. His theories, published in La Escatología Musulmana en la Divina Comedia (Islamic Eschatology in ...


8

Much of the potential for controversy can be put down to the reputation of its author It would seem that this is less about controversy surrounding the book itself, and more about its author, and about the potential for controversy. Sayyid Qutb is a polarizing figure. To quote Wikipedia's brief description: Even though most of his observations and criticism ...


7

Prosody is the science that describes poetry forms called meters or seas (bohor) in Arabic. The comparison between two prosodies requires some basic knowledge of both prosodies. In western prosodies there is one form with two analogous but different contents. Sound and prosodic syllables are represented by U for both unstressed (English) and short (Latin) ...


5

Gar is a northern English and Scottish word that can mean to make, to cause. The phrase "gars me pine" means roughly "makes me feel sad". The OED has many citations showing different shades of meaning, few from the last century or so. If you google "gars me pine" you will find it in places like the 1885 poetry of Alick Murray whose poem "Oh! Cauld Cauld" ...


4

It's difficult to be sure. Wilfrid Scawen Blunt was an Englishman who travelled extensively in the Middle East, spending many years in Egypt but also seeing other Arabic speaking countries such as Algeria and Syria. He was known as a poet and a translator of Arabic poetry. In particular, he worked together with his wife Anne Blunt on translations from ...


3

TL;DR: Most likely an error of composition or copying. The 15th century Syrian ‘Galland manuscript’, the oldest extant manuscript of the Nights. Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Arabe 3609–11. There is a lot of variation among the manuscripts of the Nights, and not all versions have the porter retell the list of shops. For example, in Edward ...


2

In the section of Tuczay's paper entitled "The Automaton and the Genie in the Bottle", she covers the history of mechanical moving figures both in literature and in history, from the legendary Daedalus to the real-life Heron of Alexandria. She notes regarding the latter that: Several inventions mentioned in his Pneumatica bear resemblance not only to the ...


2

The framing story of 1001 nights allows the number of nights to be nowhere close to the number of stories. Sometimes, one story would last for 3 or more nights due to the introduction of so called Red Herrings. Shaharazad would start a story one night, then in that story a character would tell a story to a different character as a way of teaching him some ...


1

A search of the OCLC WorldCat catalogue for an Arabic language book with the title Flowers of the Spring returns six results, of which Zahr al-rabi by Niʻmat Allāh ibn ʻAbd Allāh Jazāʼirī seems promising (although clicking on that title reveals there are multiple variations on the author's name). A further WorldCat search just for that title offers 74 ...


1

"1001 Nights" refers to the story that links all the other stories together (framing device); the story of the king who slays his unfaithful wife and decides to marry a new woman each day and kill her the next morning. When he marries Shaharazad she begins telling him a story (and stories within that story) that takes all night and still isn't finished by ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible