10

The author describes the novel as having a sort of external third-person viewpoint ... I found an interview with Neil Gaiman in which he says that Shadow isn't like most point-of-view characters: we don't get inside his head much, but rather experience events together with him. I actually wrote the entire first chapter in the first person. That was my first ...


7

Warning: answer contains MASSIVE unmarked spoilers! Lack of surprise fits with the process he's going through. After Shadow dies on the tree, his entire experience in the succeeding chapters is a surreal journey of enlightenment and oblivion. He forgets real-world things like his name, and learns so much more (which he soon forgets after coming back to ...


6

I disagree with your second paragraph - she plays quite an important role in Lakeside, when she defends Shadow from Audrey, and doesn't give him away to police (despite having multiple reasons to report him). I believe it was important for Shadow to see that there are people who trust him and believe him, and in him, which is important at the end of the ...


3

Hmm, good question. Let's look carefully at how Gaiman describes stories of "male" and "female" type in his essay "All Books Have Genders" (emphasis mine): Books have sexes; or to be more precise, books have genders. They do in my head, anyway. Or at least, the ones that I write do. And these are genders that have something, ...


1

Although it is likely that the only reason Shadow was able to cause the snowfall was because of his inheritance as a God's son, at that point in the book, I think Wednesday was just leading Shadow to believe that his belief was what caused the snowfall so as to not reveal who he really was. If anyone Could in fact focus their beliefs to alter reality, I ...


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