15 votes

What did "Moloch" represent in Allen Ginsberg´s poem "Howl"?

The first and second parts of Howl are, in a way, a question and an answer. One cannot read the terrible things that happened to real people and not think, "Why were these brilliant thinkers ...
HDE 226868's user avatar
  • 5,864
13 votes
Accepted

Whose were the "best minds" being destroyed in Ginsberg's "Howl"?

My view of Howl is that the first lines are the introduction to the first part, painting an image with a broad brush, and that the next follows on in more detail. In fact, we can take all of Part I as ...
HDE 226868's user avatar
  • 5,864
4 votes
Accepted

What are the "animal heads of the flowers" in Allen Ginsberg's Transcription of Organ Music?

It's a metaphor to emphasize the difference between the movable heads of flowers and their static leaves and stems. First, note how the poem is at pains to point out that the leaves stay still: ...
Matt Thrower's user avatar
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2 votes

In "Howl", what does "Blake-light tragedy" mean?

Many erroneously assume that Blake-light tragedy is a reference William Blake, who was indeed an enormous influence on Ginsberg and whom Ginsberg does make allusions to elsewhere in other works. ...
Sean M. Chase's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

In "Howl", what does "Blake-light tragedy" mean?

It's a hyphen, not a dash, so its function is not to mark a pause. At first glance the word "light" might be taken to mean "intellectually or spiritually less than profound", in the sense that one ...
ool's user avatar
  • 126

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