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It was an allegory because, in spite of his dislike, Tolkien felt it was necessary and inevitable that it should be one. In several lesser-known quotes, the author freely admits that the tale is allegorical. Most clearly he states: "Of course my story is not an allegory of Atomic power, but of Power." The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien #186 He also ...


7

Original Authorial intent: "Three Musketeer"-ish pre-Age-of-Discovery kinda-Spain-cum-Russia-or-France (sans muskets). Based on Boris Strugatsky's "Commentaries to the past" (which comments on most of their works in great detail), quoting the original 1963 letter from Arkady Strugatsky where the idea of the book was discussed: «...Существует где-то ...


6

How much does this poem differ from the Bible story? The poem appears to be mostly consistent with the original Biblical story (starting with Gen. 22:3, through part of Gen. 22:13). As to your three bulleted points: "took the fire with him, and a knife" is, indeed, part of the story (Gen. 22:6). The only thing Abraham built was an altar (Gen. 22:9)...


5

An allegory is an extended metaphor. A metaphor might have one point of commonality between the story and reality; the allegory might have many. Allegory and metaphor are figures of speeches often seen in literature and art. Metaphor is a phrasal expression, which is used to make a comparison of unrelated objects and actions. Allegory can be said to be an ...


3

Communities of the Light Ones and the Dark Ones can be interpreted as a political allegory. Here is a dialog from the first book "Night Watch", Story 2, Chapter 2: Anton: «A Dark Magician can heal; a Light Magician can kill,» I said. «That's the truth. Do you know what the difference is between Light and Darkness?» Svetlana: «No, I don't. For some ...


3

I have been unable to find any definite story of a parabolic woman who collected valueless things. However a closer reading of the G. K. Chesterton story, especially reading the context of the quotes above, reveal that when the two specific items are mentioned, an old doctor's brass-plate and a wooden leg, they refer to a (male) character in the story who ...


2

There is a misapprehension in the question. An allegory is a fiction in which characters, places and events stand for real people and concepts. For example, in Spenser’s Faerie Queene, the characters represent virtues and vices, and in Orwell’s Animal Farm, the animals represent people from the Russian Revolution. Chapter 1 of Silent Spring is not an ...


2

A possible source for this idea might be a story from the Bible, 2 Kings, Chapter 4. Quoting from the New International Version: The wife of a man from the company of the prophets cried out to Elisha, “Your servant my husband is dead, and you know that he revered the Lord. But now his creditor is coming to take my two boys as his slaves.” [...] Elisha said, ...


2

If you want you can interpret the books this way. But I honestly just think that she didn't care about such things. I believe that the way a Quidditch game ends simply serves as her goal to write a compelling story. It's useful when the main character can be super important in something. In the end, it is a book for children (specifically the first few) so ...


1

You're confusing allegory with applicability. Allegory implies authorial intent while applicability is up to the reader. Tolkien understood that applicability was out of his control. Readers can see things in writings that the author maybe never considered. But he was annoyed when people tried to read into his work and make out what kind of person he was.


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