Skip to main content
7 votes
Accepted

Who is the 'pale Titan-woman' in Swinburne's 'Ave atque Vale'?

The general interpretation of this line is that it's an allusion to Baudelaire's poem La Géante (The Giantess). From Walter Martin's translation in an omnibus edition: When Mother Nature filled the ...
CDR's user avatar
  • 3,308
5 votes

Who is the 'pale Titan-woman' in Swinburne's 'Ave atque Vale'?

Swinburne’s ‘Ave atque Value’ (1868) is subtitled “In Memory of Charles Baudelaire”, who died in 1867. The poem contains allusions to a number of Baudelaire’s poems, and when looking for a “pale Titan-...
Gareth Rees's user avatar
  • 58.4k
3 votes
Accepted

Who or what is 'our God' in Swinburne's 'Ave atque Vale'?

Jerome McGann offers the following interpretation of this line: Swinburne describes his active and passive relation to the noble dead when he speaks of the “opening leaves of holy poets’ pages.” They ...
Gareth Rees's user avatar
  • 58.4k
1 vote

Who is the 'pale Titan-woman' in Swinburne's 'Ave atque Vale'?

This poem also has many callbacks, most notably the title, to the Roman Catullus' poem of the same name. That poem contains the line "fortūna mihī tētē abstulit ipsum", "Fortuna has ...
thegreatemu's user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible