21

The Charge of the Light Brigade glorifies the warriors, not the war. Throughout the poem, we see exaltation of the soldiers for their bravery. They are described as brave, bold, and having "fought so well". However, the second stanza reveals that the poem's writer considered the charge a farce: Not tho' the soldier knew Some one had blunder'd: ...


12

This interpretation is largely based on discussions I had with one of my professors and classmates about The Kraken and Tennyson’s use of symbolism in general. We believe that The Kraken, like other poems of Tennyson's, should be looked at with an idea of the political and social climes of the Victorian age. Tennyson’s work is often permeated with social ...


11

The 1842 version is the more well-known version of this poem, and it most certainly is a revision of the first version. The University of Iowa (starting at "The Two Versions") conducted a thorough analysis of why Tennyson might have thought it necessary to make the changes he did. I'll give a rough summary, but many of the details are listed on that page. ...


10

The word stay here means stop or pause. From Merriam-Webster: intransitive verb 1: to stop going forward : pause 2: to stop doing something : cease Or from the Macmillan dictionary: 4 [transitive] formal to stop something such as a court case from continuing The defence has filed a petition to stay proceedings. The sense is: If ...


10

It does both. It glorifies the six hundred while criticizing the leaders of the charge. Here's some quotes highlighting it: 'All in the valley of Death' - Shows the mistake sending soldiers to their deaths 'Someone had blundered.' - Shows the mistake 'Into the jaws of Death, Into the mouth of hell' - shows how they were blindly sent to their ...


10

The reference is to the properties of water refracting the light spectrum, effectively producing a rainbow. The OED bears this out with the following definition of 'Bow'.: II. Specific uses. A rainbow. (Mostly contextual or poetical for the compound.) In fact the OED specifically cites this line as an example of this usage: 1850 Tennyson ...


8

Tennyson was indeed writing iambic pentameter. Certain substitutions are traditionally allowed in iambic pentameter, namely, a foot can be replaced by a trochee or a spondee, and two adjacent feet can be replaced by a double iamb. Here are some examples. Trochaic substitutions: much have and cities are trochee in the lines: Much have I seen and known; ...


8

The full sentence of these two lines is: A curse is on her if she stay to look down to Camelot The translation of this verse to modern prose would be: She will be cursed if she keeps looking at Camelot and not on her weaving Therefore she focuses on her weaving intently, but gets captivated by the reflections of the outside world in her mirror. And ...


6

I think this is too black-and-white. The poem is not about war, but about an event. The poem praises the courage of the soldiers, who obey even if it means certain death. It is like a requiem for these brave men. It also criticizes the failure of the officers. "Forward, the Light Brigade!" Was there a man dismay'd? Not tho' the soldier knew ...


5

In this poem, Tennyson uses nonstandard spelling to convey the dialect of Lincolnshire where he grew up. His son Hallam wrote: The Lincolnshire dialect poems are so true in dialect and feeling, that when they were first read in that county a farmer’s daughter exclaimed, “That’s Lincoln labourer’s talk, and I thought Mr Tennyson was a gentleman.” ...


5

The poem appears to glorify war with its talk of bravery and talk of honouring the light brigade. However, the second to last stanza appears to contradict this: While horse and hero fell. They that had fought so well Came through the jaws of Death, Back from the mouth of hell, All that was left of them, Left of six hundred. The poem both ...


4

As to 1, the sun "beating" is a common way of saying the sun was shining very brightly, oppressively brightly. One of the senses of "to beat" in the OED is "transf. Of water, waves, wind, weather, the sun's rays, and other physical agents: To dash against, impinge on, strike, violently assail"; one of the citations is to Spenser: "The Sunnebeame so sore ...


4

It's hard to answer questions about the meaning of a particular event or object in a given work. Such questions seem to rely on a one-to-one allegorical equivalence: a clean shirt means a soul unbesmirched by sin, twilight means approaching death, etc. But literature doesn't make meaning through a system where decoding a given token yields its intended ...


2

When can their glory fade? O the wild charge they made! All the world wondered. Honour the charge they made, Honour the Light Brigade, Noble six hundred. The last stanza, I think, makes it clear. While horse and hero fell. They that had fought so well Came through the jaws of Death, It is also there when they are ...


2

The context of the Tennyson quote is a eulogy to Prince Albert, in the Dedication of Idylls of the King (and therefore the implied context of a connection to King Arthur?) Not swaying to this faction or to that; Not making his high place the lawless perch Of winged ambitions, nor a vantage-ground For pleasure; but through all this tract of years ...


1

Context: this poem is part of a pair, "Northern Farmer - Old Style" and "Northern Farmer - New Style", both written in strong dialect from Tennyson's home county of Lincolnshire, in which Tennyson portrays the differing attitudes of the 'traditional' and 'modern' farmers of the time. For the specific lines you're asking about: "summun" is a common and ...


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