13

Pope is using the word ‘expletive’ in this sense: A word or phrase that fills out a sentence or metrical line without adding anything to the sense; a word or phrase serving as a grammatical place-filler. Oxford English Dictionary. ‘Expletive’, n. sense B.1.a. (This sense later evolved into the modern sense of the word, “an emphatic exclamation with which a ...


8

Pope uses “grateful” in this sense: grateful, adj., 1. Pleasing to the mind or the senses, agreeable, acceptable, welcome. Oxford English Dictionary. and not in the more usual sense of “feeling gratitude”. So the meaning of the line is that Agamemnon’s massacre is pleasing to vultures, who will feast on the corpses, and not to wives, who will mourn their ...


6

In the passage The first paragraph here proposes (through a somewhat rhetorical line of questioning) that novels are meant to help provide a moral model for society: they show us models so that we can amend our ways The second paragraph proposes the exact opposite, by arguing that there is no standard moral model. That is, it argues that there is no "...


5

Hector is indeed threatening his own men. These lines are a translation of Iliad XV.343–351. ὄφρ᾽ οἳ τοὺς ἐνάριζον ἀπ᾽ ἔντεα, τόφρα δ᾽ Ἀχαιοὶ τάφρῳ καὶ σκολόπεσσιν ἐνιπλήξαντες ὀρυκτῇ ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθα φέβοντο, δύοντο δὲ τεῖχος ἀνάγκῃ. Ἕκτωρ δὲ Τρώεσσιν ἐκέκλετο μακρὸν ἀΰσας ‘νηυσὶν ἐπισσεύεσθαι, ἐᾶν δ᾽ ἔναρα βροτόεντα: ὃν δ᾽ ἂν ἐγὼν ἀπάνευθε νεῶν ἑτέρωθι νοήσω,...


5

Hector is urging his men to attack the Greek ships bravely, but without plundering them afterwards. He says: If you run away from the battle, or if you lag behind so that you’re not on its front lines, I will make sure you die a dishonorable death anyway. So don’t try to save yourself. Likewise if you stop to plunder the ships. Edit based on comment from ...


2

Pope is talking about how most people just care about how a poem sounds ("Who haunt Parnassus but to please their Ear") and not what it actually says ("Not mend their minds"). In particular he notes how "ten low Words oft creep in one dull Line, / While they ring round the same unvary'd Chimes" - that is, how the sound of the poem ("Chimes") is "unvary'd" ...


2

This is a paraphrase of the Johnson's text quoted in the question. It is clear that Johnson sees differences between the two poets, thinking the one is capable of better work, but not consistently so, whereas the other more-or-less always produces equally good work. Paragraph 1: Dryden was better educated, smarter, had deeper thoughts than Pope did. ...


2

Auden Young's answer discusses the first occurrence of the expression "Whatever is, is right" in Alexander Pope's Essay on Man but overlooks that the other instances. Pope uses the expression three times: once at the end of Epistle 1, two times in Epistle 4. Pope's Essay on Man is an example of theodicy, its goal is to "vindicate the ways of ...


1

This was a very popular idea of 17th and 18th centuries philosophy. In a very broad stroke, with gross simplification: everything is a manifestation of the single underlying Idea, and since the Idea itself is right, its manifestations must also be right. One may call this Idea God, or Music of Spheres, or Law of Nature. Hegel summarized it in his famous Was ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible