8

Initially, there isn't much. The final words of Part I read this: I wanted to hear the murmur of its water again, to escape from the sum and the effort and the women's tears, and to relax in the shade again. But when I got nearer, I saw that Raymond's Arab had come back. He was alone. He was lying on his back, with his hands behind his head ... As far as ...


7

In this chapter, Camus is comparing "the Christian and Marxist world," and finds that the two have much more in common with each other than either does with the "ancient world" – by which he largely means Aristotelian Greece. "For the Christian, as for the Marxist, nature must be subdued;" he writes. It may help to understand if we restore the full text of ...


7

I'm not sure if whole books have been written on the topic, but at least whole book chapters have been. I haven't read this book, but I'll share my first impression. One thing to note is that the English translation you quote is reasonably faithful. It slightly misses the effect of the original, however, in that it doesn't use a future tense. A more ...


6

So from the context, here's my understanding: A common trend that's observed from a lot of A Happy Death is the treatment of women as mere objects, rather than as human beings. This is portrayed quite well in the beginning of that paragraph: The natural stupidity which glowed in her eyes emphasized her remote, impassive expression. The remark, "hello, ...


4

This is conjectural, but just before the passage in question, Camus writes something like We sail across spaces so vast they seem unending. Sun and moon rise and fall in turn, on the same thread of light and night. Days at sea, as similar each to the other as happiness . . . which to me echos some (but not all) of this passage in R. L. Stevenson's In ...


2

The original French text is: Jusqu’ici chaque fois que Mersault avait lié avec une femme les premiers gestes qui engagent, conscient du malheur qui veut que l’amour et le désir s’expriment de la même façon, il songeait à la rupture avant d’avoir serré cet être dans ses bras. My literal translation: So far each time that Mersault had associated with a ...


1

I haven't read this book and I may be wrong as I don't know the whole context but reading out the sentence, I can interpret it as: Everthing is temporary. There is a simple yet powerful statement "Time heals all wounds" which means pain doesnot last forever and in the future we will forget and move on. Same can be said for happiness as it doesn't ...


1

The first sentence, in French, contains an ambiguity about time which can't be translated into English. The original line is: "Aujourd'hui, maman est morte. Où peut-être hier, je ne sais pas." In written French the past historic tense is normally used, but as this novel has a first person narrator, he uses the "passé composé" tense normally used in everyday ...


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