9

This referred to a lack of purpose and drive which was a consequence of having witnessed pointless death on such a huge scale. In the aftermath of the war there arose a group of young persons known as the "Lost Generation." The term was coined from something Gertrude Stein witnessed the owner of a garage saying to his young employee, which Hemingway later ...


8

The final choice to make "A Moveable Feast" the title was made by Hemingway's fourth wife, Mary. It was supposedly suggested by Hemingway's friend, A. E. Hostner. While the Hemingway quote is certainly the source of the title, the phrase "A Moveable Feast" clearly predates Hemingway. It originally referred to a Roman Catholic feast not associated with a ...


5

The idea of the “lost generation” is best seen in Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises in which theme of emptiness looms large. The title itself, succinctly captures the idea in the Bible and in light of the biblical context, it is clearly pregnant with meaning. Here is the passage: The words of the Preacher, the son of David, king in Jerusalem. “Vanity ...


4

Hemingway's generation was what William Strauss and Neil Howe called a "reactive" generation in their book Generations: A History of America's Future, 1584-2069. This is one of four generational "types" that rotate in an (almost) fixed sequence. (The most modern "reactive" generation is Generation X.) The "reactive" ...


1

The question asks why Hemingway included this story in A Moveable Feast. But it is not clear that he did include it! Hemingway died in 1961 before the book was finished; his widow Mary edited his notes into the first edition, published 1964, and in this edition the story does not appear. Whether this was due to Ernest’s intention or Mary’s judgement is now ...


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