6

So from the context, here's my understanding: A common trend that's observed from a lot of A Happy Death is the treatment of women as mere objects, rather than as human beings. This is portrayed quite well in the beginning of that paragraph: The natural stupidity which glowed in her eyes emphasized her remote, impassive expression. The remark, "hello, ...


4

Camus loved the sea and nature generally. His unfinished early novel La Mort heureuse contains a scene in which Patrice Mersault goes swimming in the sea; the scene is described in very sensuous terms. (See Albert Camus, La Mort heureuse, Le bain de mer, in French.) So on a very literal level, Mersault can be read as mer (sea) and sault/saut (jump; the ...


2

The original French text is: Jusqu’ici chaque fois que Mersault avait lié avec une femme les premiers gestes qui engagent, conscient du malheur qui veut que l’amour et le désir s’expriment de la même façon, il songeait à la rupture avant d’avoir serré cet être dans ses bras. My literal translation: So far each time that Mersault had associated with a ...


1

I haven't read this book and I may be wrong as I don't know the whole context but reading out the sentence, I can interpret it as: Everthing is temporary. There is a simple yet powerful statement "Time heals all wounds" which means pain doesnot last forever and in the future we will forget and move on. Same can be said for happiness as it doesn't ...


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