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For questions pertaining to terms used in the study of literature, including the names of the genres, tropes, terms used for analysis, and so forth.

4
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This is simply known as third-person narration. This technique is far from new. A notable user of third-person narration was Julius Caesar in his Commentarii de Bello Gallico / Commentaries on the Gal …
answered Nov 30 '17 by Christophe Strobbe
3
votes
Strictly speaking, a poem is a grook when it was published by the Danish scientist and poet Piet Hein in one of his volumes of "grooks". Grooks are simply what Hein called his own poems; it is not a w …
answered Aug 13 '18 by Christophe Strobbe
7
votes
Dr. L. Kip Wheeler's glossary of literary terms defines alliteration as Repeating a consonant sound in close proximity to others, or beginning several words with the same vowel sound. The glossa …
answered Nov 29 '17 by Christophe Strobbe
7
votes
In German, this type of phrase is known as a "Wendesatz". (Unfortunately, I couldn't find an online dictionary that explains the term, let alone a translation.) Below are a few examples. Some of them …
answered Sep 29 '17 by Christophe Strobbe
2
votes
The best-known type of poetry that plays with text alignment is concrete poetry. The term was coined in the 1950s (Meid: 468) and should not be confused with visual poetry (Knörrich: 121). The Swiss …
answered Aug 13 '18 by Christophe Strobbe
5
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Proem is most definitely not a typo for "poem". Proem comes from Latin prooemium, which comes from Ancient Greek προοίμιον (Henry George Liddell, Robert Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon, 1940): A. o …
answered Nov 2 '18 by Christophe Strobbe
4
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Merriam-Webster's definition of "ode" is not very useful for determining whether a specific poem is an ode: the definition is too vague and it ignores the genre's history. The Oxford Companion to En …
answered Aug 25 '18 by Christophe Strobbe