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For questions about the English author J.R.R. (John Ronald Reuel) Tolkien or about any of his literary works, most famously The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, The Silmarillion, and the other works making up the Middle-Earth legendarium.

1
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It's worth noting that Tolkien based all of his riddles in style, and some of them in actual wording, on classical "old literary" riddles. As mentioned in the answer to Who wrote Tolkien's riddles?: …
answered Jun 28 '17 by Rand al'Thor
8
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They probably had at least some contact with those lands. Dorwinion is a land adjacent to the Sea of Rhun, at least according to this map by Pauline Baynes: And the Elves of Mirkwood, at least, dr …
answered Apr 6 '17 by Rand al'Thor
10
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He might be addressing Frodo more as a generic hobbit than as himself. This is immediately after the following short speech from Frodo: "No, Sam!" said Frodo. "Do not kill him even now. For he ha …
answered Apr 5 '17 by Rand al'Thor
6
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TL;DR: basically any language with strong etymological connections to English (plus Hebrew). There's a lot of information about languages in Appendix F of The Lord of the Rings (itself a condensed ve …
answered May 19 '18 by Rand al'Thor
2
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She didn't care about it. Little she knew of or cared for towers, or rings, or anything devised by mind or hand, who only desired death for all others, mind and body, and for herself a glut of l …
answered Jan 11 by Rand al'Thor
23
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Voronwë's answer is excellent, but I'm going to post the answer I was planning to anyway. LotR is a gripping tale; the Silmarillion is more like a textbook or encyclopedia. This is a slight exagger …
answered Jun 28 '17 by Rand al'Thor