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4
votes
1answer
61 views

Who were the tongueless men of Coromandae?

On the first page of Chapter VII in Thomas Deloney's novel Jack of Newbury, the narrator tells us (italics from the original), Halfe the day sometime would hee sit by her, as shee was waighing ...
1
vote
0answers
57 views

How is “Of Mice and Men” by John Steinbeck still relevant to readers of today?

I guess isolation and social exclusion of different groups is something of relevance. e.g. -Crooks: racism -Curley's Wife: misogynism -Candy: ageism -Lennie: ableism But i still can't think of any ...
2
votes
1answer
43 views

What is Baltasar Gracián's original quote to “Some never arrive at being complete, somewhat is always awanting”?

Can anyone find the original quote from Baltasar Gracián in the Spanish he wrote this in? Some never arrive at being complete, somewhat is always awanting. From The art of worldy wisdom.
1
vote
0answers
35 views

From which obituary of a male “New Republic” editor do these details sound familiar?

I read it many years ago, but infuriatingly cannot find it. It appeared in The New Republic roughly between 2003 and 2012 by a woman (I think a mentee of his) with a remarkably simple, crystalline ...
3
votes
0answers
52 views

What is the difference between spatial and temporal paratext?

According to Gérard Genette, the paratext is what is beyond a text, e.g.: the cover, the title, the interviews about a novel... Paratext can be devided into two categories: spatial and temporal. The ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

US Civil War story: man hanged from a bridge

I read a story a long time ago about a Civil War soldier who was being hanged from a bridge but the rope broke and he escaped. It goes through all the things he went through after escaping but then it ...
4
votes
1answer
77 views

Why did Andromache call the men of Sparta ‘devious plotters and the master of lies’?

Why does Euripides put the following speech into the mouth of Andromache, in his play of the same name? Andromache: (Breaking into a rage) Inhabitants of Sparta, most hated men on earth, devious ...
1
vote
0answers
27 views

A song of ice and fire - Is there a synopsis available?

At some point in the undeterminate future, George RR Martin will release the next book in the Song of Ice and Fire series. Considering that the last book was released so long ago, is there (or will ...
3
votes
1answer
52 views

Description of a character in 'War and peace'

In the book 'War and peace ' , the characters seem to mention the name of a person ' countess Apraksina ' with a tone of respect and concern in chapter 10. This character 'countess Apraksina' is not ...
3
votes
0answers
42 views

Was Hemingway schizophrenic?

Surrounding the death of Ernest Hemingway, there are declarations that he suffered vigilance from the FBI. It is also said that he believed badly that he was being checked at every turn by goverment ...
4
votes
0answers
61 views

Pre Colonial Native American coming of age story about a girl who travels across the country for food

I read this book forever ago. It is a Native American inspired story about a girl whose village needs food. Her grandmother had a vision and sends her to travel across the country with a man (no real ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

Spanish translation of Adversity Quotient?

I was reading the book Adversity Quotient by Dr. Paul G. Stoltz and I would like to make a gift with that book to someone, but that person is not fluent in English (it's a Spanish citizen). Is there ...
4
votes
1answer
382 views

What does collachrimation mean?

The end Thomas Nashe's novel The Unfortunate Traveller takes a very antisemitic turn when both the novel's main character (Jack Wilton) and his concubine fall into the hands of a Jew named Zadoch. ...
2
votes
1answer
35 views

What does “have you no cacke a bed” mean?

In chapter VII of Thomas Deloney's novel Jack of Newbury an Italian merchant named Benedicke tries to woo Jone. After some time, Jone gets tired of this and tries to trick him into sleeping with a sow,...
4
votes
0answers
63 views

In War and Peace, why do all the generals and Kutuzov consider it “impossible” to defend Moscow?

After the battle of Borodino, in which the Russians apparently did well, why did the French simply advance to Moscow and why was it considered inevitable that Moscow would be abandoned and the army ...
3
votes
0answers
40 views

Is it a widespread tradition to inscribe family tree in the back of holy book?

Reading Shame (1983) by Salman Rushdie, and came to such a sentence. Lost in the forest of new relatives, wandering in the bloodjungle of the matriarchal home, Bilquis consulted the family Quran in ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Middle Grade book read in 2001

I read this book in middle school in 2000/2001. I don’t recall that it was a popular or extremely current book, as nobody else had chosen to read it in our class, but I don’t think it could have been ...
5
votes
1answer
42 views

Meaning of “every dewdrop paints a bow” from In Memoriam, Section CXXII by Alfred lord Tennyson

And every dewdrop paints a bow A line by Alfred Lord Tennyson, from section CXXII of his poem In Memoriam. What is the poet actually trying to convey with this line? The verse in context: And all ...
7
votes
2answers
121 views

Why does Linus say “I think you finished it” to Sally in this Sunday strip?

So in December 22nd, 1985, Charles Schulz made this following Christmas themed Sunday panel featuring Linus and Sally. Linus is reading Sally the second chapter of the Book of Luke (from the Bible), ...
8
votes
0answers
48 views

Was Edmund in the Narnia series loosely inspired by Edmund in King Lear?

In King Lear, Edmund, resentful of his inferior status to his older brother, betrays his family and frames his brother as a traitor. This strikes me as not being at all unlike what Edmund does in The ...
6
votes
1answer
97 views

Was the N.I.C.E. director modelled on H. G. Wells?

Wikipedia claims that the character of Horace Jules in C. S. Lewis's That Hideous Strength - ostensibly the Director and boss of the N.I.C.E. organisation, in reality a figurehead manipulated by those ...
13
votes
5answers
5k views

Did William Shakespeare hide things in his writings?

I was reading Shakespeare's third sonnet, and I noticed something funny. I am going to put in bold all the capital letters in the sonnet itself. Sonnet III When fortie Winters shall ...
4
votes
1answer
66 views

Why the capitalization of “Heavens” in Rudyard Kipling's “The Secret of the Machines”?

In Rudyard Kipling's poem The Secret of the Machines the last stanza goes as follows: Though our smoke may hide the Heavens from your eyes, It will vanish and the stars will shine again, ...
7
votes
0answers
77 views

What was the unspeakable act that V.S. Naipaul committed while at Oxford University?

On 28 Sep. 1952, V.S. Naipaul wrote the following to his father: The very fact that I can write about future plans ought to hearten you. You see, I have really been suffering from an abnormal ...
2
votes
1answer
201 views

Why is Jesus upset with God? [closed]

In the gospels of Matthew and Mark in the Bible, Jesus says My God, My God, why have you forsaken me? Is this a sign that Jesus is upset with God?
3
votes
1answer
23 views

What does it mean to be as good as George a Green?

In Thomas Deloney's novel Jack of Newbury, a woman wants to marry Iohn/John ("Jack" in the novel's title) and tricks him into going to church with her where she will be married. After the widow and ...
8
votes
3answers
626 views

How long had Bertha Mason been in the attic at the point of the events in Jane Eyre

I am trying to work out how long Bertha Mason had been locked up by the time we reach Thornfield in the story. This is part of an argument I am working for work and I haven't been able to find a ...
3
votes
2answers
66 views

What is a Pippin at Michaelmas?

In chapter X of Thomas Deloney's novel Jack of Newbury, a few characters want to take revenge on a "Mistresse Franke" (italics from the original, bold by me): Now certaine of the maidens of the ...
2
votes
0answers
167 views

Whose fingerprint is on the cover of “Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind”?

I'm interested in finding out whose fingerprint is on the cover of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari. Could it belong to Mr Harari, or his father (whom the book was dedicated ...
3
votes
0answers
16 views

Is there a list of points unique to Layamon's telling of the King Arthur story?

Is there a list of points unique to Layamon's retelling of the Arthurian legends? For example, as far as I can tell, the story of Arthur being raised in Avalon (as opposed to with Sir Ector) is unique ...
4
votes
1answer
52 views

Is there any technical term for a type of reading that focuses on minor characters in a literary work?

Is there any technical term for a type of reading that focuses on minor characters in a literary work? For example, a type of reading that focuses on the character of Polonius in William Shakespeare's ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Who were the snake-eating Candians that Nashe is referring to?

Near the end of Thomas Nashe's novel The Unfortunate Traveller a compatriot tells the main character that travelling abroad is a bad idea for Englishmen (italics from the original): Alas, our ...
3
votes
0answers
35 views

Weird Timeline in ‘Salem’s Lot’

Describing the history of the Marsten House in the novel Salem’s Lot, Stephen King writes of the Marsten family: He and his wife had retired wealthy to ‘salem’s Lot in 1929, and had lost a good ...
5
votes
1answer
59 views

What is the text Ivan refers to in the preface to the Grand Inquisitor

Before declaming the Grand Inquisitor in the Brothers Karamazov, Ivan refers to a poem with the virgin Marie visiting Hell and begging God for mercy for its inhabitants. Is this a real poem? If so, ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

Where did Thomas Nashe get the Latin quote he attributes to Epicharmus?

In the novel The Unfortunate Traveller, Thomas Nashe attributes a Latin quote to a certain Epicharmus (italics from the original): The onely precept that a traveller hath most use of, and shall ...
8
votes
0answers
108 views

Book that I read in 1987 at school - trying to find

In 1987 I began high school. There was one YA novel that the school librarian put on a special part of the shelf because it was "too frightening". If this was reverse psychology it worked because I ...
6
votes
2answers
114 views

What could “mouths deformed against stone” mean?

In Ted Hughes' "The Contender" (which I already asked about once), there's a phrase which I can't figure. Here are the lines: "All the women in the world could not move him They came their mouths ...
3
votes
2answers
87 views

What does “card” in the title “Gwydonius; The Card of Fancie” mean?

Robert Greene's novel Gwydonius; The Card of Fancie was first published in 1584. The novel's main character, Gwydonius, is the only son of the the duke of Mettelyne (presumably Mytilene). He travels ...
5
votes
0answers
51 views

source of a certain Asimov quotation

Somewhere Isaac Asimov remarks that the citadel of truth can only be breached by a brute-force assault. I would like the exact source of this quote.
3
votes
0answers
59 views

Story ends with son washing dishes, flinging dishwater outside in the cold

This short story was told by a narrator and was something about an unsavory man. I don't remember how he was unsavory exactly. The only part I remember is the ending: the narrator is outside the UM'...
3
votes
1answer
30 views

What does Mother Cornelius tub refer to?

In chapter II of The Unfortunate Traveller, Thomas Nashe describes an outbreak of the sweating sickness. The cause of this disease is apparently still unknown. Below is a relevant paragraph from that ...
4
votes
0answers
29 views

What work or story about Lampana and Cleophila is Robert Greene referring to?

In Robert Greene's novel Gwydonius; The Carde of Fancie, the character Melytta has guessed that Castania has fallen in love. At the end of a long speech, she says to Castania (italics from the ...
4
votes
1answer
35 views

Which part of Propertius' Elegies is Castania referring to?

In Robert Greene's novel Gwydonius; The Carde of Fancie, Castania says to her suitor Valericus (italics from the original, bold by me), Ah Valericus, hast thou forgot the saying of Propertius, that ...
3
votes
0answers
29 views

Which part or quote in Cicero is Greene referring to?

In Robert Greene's novel Gwydonius; The Carde of Fancie, one of the characters, Castania, uses the following words in her rejection of Gwydonius (italics from the origin; bold by me): Better it is ...
2
votes
0answers
25 views

Since so many books are translated into so many languages [duplicate]

...how can one be sure the translation is correct unless one speaks that language? Prime example: The Bible. This book (for the purpose of keeping religious arguments nonexistent here, its a piece of ...
3
votes
0answers
24 views

Is this quote by Francisco d'Anconia a veiled reference to the Strike?

Early on in the book, Francisco d'Antonia comments, “In his lifetime, every one of my ancestors raised the production of d’Anconia Copper by about ten per cent. I intend to raise it by one hundred.”...
3
votes
1answer
34 views

Difference between the two editions of “Great Books of the Western World”

I have the full original set of Great Books. I know there was an updated version published in the 70s(?). Is there a way to attain the rest without re-buying the whole set?
6
votes
0answers
48 views

What does ketha mean?

At the end of chapter VIII of Thomas Deloney's Jack of Newbury, Jack has a discussion with his wife about a certain "gossip" (an archaic term for "familiar acquaintance"), that he does not want to see ...
5
votes
2answers
95 views

What is the earliest book where bad spelling is primarily for humor value?

I've enjoyed books like Molesworth by Geoffrey Willans and The BFG by Roald Dahl, where bad spelling and grammar (the BFG's extensive writing on the dream jars) are an integral part of the joke, and ...
3
votes
1answer
29 views

Albert Thibaudet and the Geneva School?

I'm learning about the literary critic Albert Thibaudet. I read on Wikipedia that he was the co-founder of the Geneva School of literary criticism, but I don't remember my tutor mentioning that about ...

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