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14 views

William Dunseath Eaton Iskander Play

According to many accounts, Frederick B. Warde performed a play entitled Iskander in 1897-1897 season in many country theatres such Lancaster PA, Chicago, Illinois, Columbus Ohio and so on. The play ...
2
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0answers
34 views

What does it mean for George Washington to be “a Fabius and Camillus”?

On page 324 of David Hackett Fischer's book Washington's Crossing, there is an epigraph (quotation at the beginning of the chapter "The Battle at Princeton") by Horace Walpole on George ...
0
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1answer
47 views

How could the volumes of higher mathematics contain expletives in the late 19th century?

In "In the Midst of Alarms" (1894) by Robert Barr, Renmark was a typical quiet and respectful professor, but something made so crazy to swear, saying "Damn!" His use of the word ...
-1
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0answers
41 views

Does first-hand experience of suffering lead to literary innovation? [closed]

I am interested in what truths, if any, lie behind the trope of the 'suffering' artist. To what extent does first-hand experience of pain facilitate artistic creativity? In particular, I was wondering ...
0
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0answers
13 views

Why is the encounter with the rats not covered in detail?

In Watership Down by Richard Adams, the band of rabbits face a number of ordeals during their journey from Sandleford Warren to Watership Down: crossing a river while there's a dog loose in the woods, ...
0
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0answers
38 views

Data regarding stories of books

I'm currently conducting research for my university and we would like to geographically pinpoint where stories in books take place. This will create a database which we will need for our further ...
1
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2answers
52 views

How could “chaperonage” be the right of a girl?

In "In the Midst of Alarms" (1894) by Robert Barr, Miss Kitty was a rural Canadian carefree girl, Renmark was a professor, and Yates was that young man from New York: Miss Kitty Bartlett ...
4
votes
1answer
414 views

Which does this part refer to, a pencil or the words?

I’d like to ask about the sentence in The Red Circle by Conan Doyle. The words are written with a broad-pointed, violet-tinted pencil of a not unusual pattern. This is uttered by Holmes when he saw ...
1
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0answers
21 views

What did Tara Westover mean in the book Educated?

What did Tara Westover try to imply when she compared the accident, her family suffered in her childhood with Choices, numberless as grains of sand, had layered and compressed, coalescing into ...
3
votes
1answer
56 views

Sonnet 39 of Astrophil and Stella: Are these epithets or metaphors?

This is Sonnet 39 of Astrophil and Stella, also known as Come Sleep! O Sleep: Come Sleep! O Sleep, the certain knot of peace, The baiting-place of wit, the balm of woe, The poor man’s wealth, the ...
3
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0answers
39 views

Why these specific “things that fly” in “Kite-Flying”?

Rose Justice, the main character of Rose Under Fire, writes several poems that appear in various places in the book. This is the second verse of Kite-Flying: Hope waits stubbornly, watching the sky ...
0
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0answers
36 views

Manga one-shot, guy helps bullied girl and competition with penalty for not speak well

I am looking for a one shot about a girl (I think wearing glasses) who can't speak loudly, and whose English is bad. Even her teacher has a hard time with her. A guy who sees her get bullied helps ...
2
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1answer
16 views

Why is death a redeemer in Robinson Jeffers's “Hurt Hawks”?

The poem "Hurt Hawks" by Robinson Jeffers is about a red-tailed hawk whose wing is so badly hurt that he'll never be able to fly again. Two lines of this poem are as follows: The curs of ...
1
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0answers
7 views

Is either Rhoda Brook or Gertrude Lodge portrayed negatively in “The Withered Arm”?

Thomas Hardy's short story "The Withered Arm" (freely available to read online) revolves largely around two female characters, Rhoda Brook and Gertrude Lodge, the two "viewpoint" ...
2
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0answers
30 views

Do literature interpretations actually reflect what the author had in mind? [duplicate]

I read an article about a writer who was asked about the interpretation of one of his books, and he had a hard time coming up with something that would be aligned with the expectations of the jury. ...
1
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0answers
30 views

German book where a hiring manager hires his former bully

I am trying to find a German book from which I read an excerpt when I was in high school studying German (between 1997 and 1999). In that book a manager at a company is reviewing applications for an ...
0
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1answer
25 views

Meaning of “much less regard” in Justice by Michael Sandel

This is from the book named Justice by Michael Sandel. I would like to know the meaning of "much less regard" and the meaning of the sentence (the second part of the sentence). How can we ...
4
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0answers
53 views

Identify a poem entitled Mock Song, written in middle English in the 13th-15th centuries

I'm looking for a middle English poem, written in the 13th-15th centuries, which I only have in translation (to Hebrew). The translated poem is found in a chapter that contains three additional poems, ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

What is the origin of the plot device where a character changes negative views about someone after spending time with them?

I feel like this is a common story element. Someone has a negative view about a person/group of people, and their worldview is changed after they are forced to spend time with that person/group. This ...
2
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1answer
25 views

“How say you then? Would heart of man once think it?” Hamlet Act 1 Scene 5

After Hamlet returns from speaking with the Ghost, he initially resists questioning about it, then suggests he will reveal what it said if the others can keep a secret, How say you then? Would heart ...
19
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1answer
4k views

Why would one of Germany's leading publishers publish a novel by Jewish writer Stefan Zweig in 1939?

I am reading the Penguin Edition of Impatience of the Heart by Stefan Zweig - also known as Beware of Pity in other translations. The reverse of the title page states that the book was first published ...
2
votes
1answer
87 views

Who is “they” that “rake him in” or “gather him in” in this passage from In the Midst of Alarms?

In In the Midst of Alarms (1894) by Robert Barr, someone was talking about a man who doesn't like attending protracted meetings for converting the sinners: He never wants to go to a protracted ...
1
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1answer
52 views

What is the meaning of “They talked of love and preached of love, But did not act so lovingly” in 'Childhood'?

The second stanza of the poem Childhood, written by Markus Natten: When did my childhood go? Was it the time I realised that adults were not all they seemed to be, They talked of love and preached of ...
1
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2answers
44 views

What does this comparison between “Chekhovian” and “Hitchcockian” lines mean?

Perpendicular lines are Chekhovian; the introduced gun goes off. Parallel lines are Hitchcockian; the present bomb is enough. I'm reading Heather Christle's The Crying Book. I do not know much about ...
2
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0answers
83 views

Is Ant-Man a Myrmidon?

The Myrmidons, the soldiers from Achilles's homeland of Thessaly who are under his command in the Iliad, get their name from myrmex or ants. Achilles himself is the arch-Myrmidon. In Shakespeare's ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Book about a mentally retarded girl being sexually assaulted by boys at her school, and one of them coming to grips with what he's done

This was one of those things that popped into my head earlier today, and I keep flashing back to it. I read this as a library book when I was in Ashland, KY, probably around the mid-90s. I think it ...
1
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0answers
18 views

Is Jonathan Culler saying that theory is the study of the background we bring to the text?

Follow-up to: Is Jonathan Culler saying that literary theory is effectively the same subject as cultural studies? From chapter 3 of the second edition of Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction by ...
6
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1answer
534 views

Why is the country conjuror referred to as a “white wizard”?

In Thomas Hardy's short story "The Withered Arm" (freely available to read online), Gertrude Lodge and Rhona Brook go together to see a man named Trendle, often called Conjuror Trendle, who ...
0
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2answers
51 views

“otherwise” in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

In Chapter Seven of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (published 1816), I saw the following sentence: I remembered also the nervous fever with which I had been seized just at the time that I dated my ...
2
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1answer
23 views

Is there a significance to Valkyrja's powerset?

In April Daniels's Nemesis series, the character Valkyrja/Karen has an unusual, very specific array of powers: I can sense where things that open the way are... Also people who are about to die, and ...
-6
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1answer
41 views

Which Animals did George Orwell Own?

What animals did George Orwell own? If possible, what they were called?
3
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0answers
36 views

What is it time for in Paul Celan's “Corona”?

From Paul Celan's poem "Corona", available e.g. here in both the original German and an English translation: It is time that the stone took the trouble to bloom That an unrest’s heart ...
6
votes
1answer
191 views

Historical King Ina and Shakespeare's King Lear in the writings of Thomas Hardy

In Thomas Hardy's short(ish) story "The Withered Arm", one of his descriptions of the Wessex countryside features the following cryptic allusion: It was a long walk; thick clouds made the ...
3
votes
1answer
68 views

“What the Turk do it matter to us”?

In the opening chapter of Thomas Hardy's "The Withered Arm", the following passage is found (emphasis mine): The discussion waxed so warm that the purr of the milk streams became jerky, ...
0
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0answers
17 views

What books on the political philosophy from the Enlightenment period can you recommend? [closed]

I have recently become increasingly interested in the philosophy from the Enlightenment period and how it relates to today's understanding of freedom, human rights and responsibility in a western ...
0
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0answers
35 views

A request for the entire full length poem 'Flatline', by Margaret Atwood [closed]

I am struggling to find the poem 'Flatline', by Margaret Atwood which is a staple for my presentation on old-age depressions. I ran out of my last credit in the New Yorker also, so I am not allowed to ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

What does “hard pushed in argument” mean in this context?

In "In the Midst of Alarms" (1894) by Robert Barr, a blacksmith, Macdonald, did an embarrassing trick to break the conceit of his New Yorker client in front of the crowd in his smithy, but ...
16
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1answer
2k views

Children’s poem about a boy stuck between the tracks on the underground

When I was young I used to love Michael Rosen. Don’t put mustard in the custard and lots of silly ones like that. I also remember that there was a darker poem in one of the poem compilation books set ...
3
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1answer
49 views

What kind of sonnet is Sonnet 24 of Sidney's “Astrophel and Stella”?

What kind of sonnet is Sonnet 24 of Philip Sidney's Astrophel and Stella? Here is the sonnet: Rich fools there be, whose base and filthy heart Lies hatching still the goods wherein they flow, And ...
1
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0answers
38 views

What's the significance of the hoofed figure walking a fish in “A Day at the Park”?

"A Day at the Park" is an excellent philosophical comic by Kostas Kiriakakis, featuring two rather odd-looking creatures discussing the merits of questions and answers. (It applies very well ...
2
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1answer
41 views

Was it common in the late 19th century to write normal places, like “cross roads” and “corners” in capital letters?

In In the Midst of Alarms (1894) by Robert Barr, a young boy was describing the place of blacksmith’s shop, saying: Oh, a couple of miles or so; down at the Cross Roads. Then he said later in ...
3
votes
2answers
95 views

What does “Dirt is matter out of place” mean in this situation?

In In the Midst of Alarms (1894) by Robert Barr, a man was afraid of riding a horse for the first time in his life, but he was eventually convinced to do that with some worry. Yates mounted with some ...
3
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0answers
63 views

Is there an anti-semitic subtext in Roald Dahl's The Witches?

I read this article which suggested that Roald Dahl's The Witches is basically a work of anti-Semitism. Now I am aware of Roald's own apparent/alleged anti-Semitism but this is a question specifically ...
2
votes
1answer
153 views

Why “in the midst of alarms” in William Cowper's poem “The Solitude of Alexander Selkirk”?

The second quatrain of William Cowper's poem "The Solitude of Alexander Selkirk" is: O Solitude! where are the charms That sages have seen in thy face? Better dwell in the midst of alarms, ...
0
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1answer
21 views

What does “There’s some fighting in that, if it is a history” mean here?

In In the Midst of Alarms (1894) by Robert Barr, a man was talking about the library of a Canadian rural township: “Well, the township can select the books if it likes, or it can send a committee to ...
1
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0answers
29 views

Spy story involving a strong magnet, a ludicrously precise X-Ray machine, and a code book

I read this somewhere in the early 90s, from a paperback book, in English. I would have sworn that this was one of the stories in Alfred Hitchcock's Sinister Spies collection, as I remember it being ...
3
votes
2answers
88 views

What does “soul” mean in “My Face for the World to See”?

From My Face for the World to See (1958) by Alfred Hayes: Ah! she said, triumphantly: the little boy hurts, doesn't it? I said, stonily, it might be a good idea if, instead of a psychiatrist, she ...
1
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1answer
37 views

Was Shaw's “Arms and the Man” inspired by Shakespeare?

In Act III of the play Arms and the Man by George Bernard Shaw, Sergius says to Louka, If these hands ever touch you again, they shall touch my affianced bride. Those words reminded me of ...
-1
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0answers
19 views

“Your voice was not audible for a sec , ” ---was this a wrong english , in a corporate enviorment [migrated]

Today I was speaking to a a HR . Due to some disturbance over the line , I could not hear her voice for a sec or so . So i told the HR "Your voice was not audible for a sec " and ask her ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

What is the correspondence of flowers with the spirit-world in Elizabeth Browning’s “Aurora Leigh”?

In book V of Aurora Leigh (1856) by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, the narrator says:                 there’s not a flower of spring, That dies ere June, but vaunts itself allied By issue and symbol, by ...

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