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Questions tagged [william-butler-yeats]

Questions about the works of Irish poet William Butler Yeats (1865-1939) or his life as a writer.

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3 votes
1 answer
110 views

Literary technique in 'for peace comes dropping slow'

In the poem 'The Lake Isle of Innisfree' by W. B. Yeats, what is the literary technique being used in the phrase, 'for peace comes dropping slow'? I'm not sure if it's anthropomorphism, pathetic ...
BadUsername's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
97 views

Scansion of a line in Yeats' "An Irish Airman Foresees His Death"?

"An Irish Airman Foresees His Death" holds a firm iambic tetrametric rhythm throughout, except for line 8, which includes 9 syllables: Or leave them happier than before; How would you scan ...
Pearl's user avatar
  • 71
3 votes
2 answers
264 views

Interpretation of W. B. Yeats' poem "All Things Can Tempt Me"?

I am working on Turkish translations of W. B. Yeats' poems and I need to compare the source text with the target text. In order to do that, first, I have to get a deeper understanding of the original ...
Batuhan Tas's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
92 views

Symbolism in the final lines of Yeats' Song of Wandering Aengus

Yeats' early poem The Song of Wandering Aengus is a poetic retelling of a famous Irish myth as I explored in this question. It's also a metaphor in which Aengus' quest for his fae lover is compared to ...
Matt Thrower's user avatar
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6 votes
0 answers
92 views

What did Yeats in his late period think of his early work?

The poetry of W.B. Yeats is commonly seen as belonging to three rough phases. The first is a Romantic and pre-Raphaelite style of flowery verse which commonly invokes figures of Irish mythology. The ...
Matt Thrower's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
114 views

The influence of Rossetti and Blake on Yeats

In Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity, Richard Rorty makes this statement in passing: "Merely philosophical" questions, like Eddington's question about the two tables, are attempts to stir ...
pseudosudo's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
249 views

How does “The Second Coming” form the background for “A Prayer for My Daughter”?

I was reading William Butler Yeats's “A Prayer for My Daughter”. The book which I was reading had a box named “Aid to Comprehend the poem” and in that box were written these lines: The poem [A Prayer ...
Knight wants Loong back's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
538 views

Comprehending “how but in custom and ceremony are innocence and beauty born”

“A Prayer for My Daughter” is a poem written by W.B. Yeats on the birth of his daughter. One of the themes of the poem is contrasting the future he desires for his daughter with the life of Maud Gonne,...
Knight wants Loong back's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

Understanding and interpreting Yeats phases of the moon

I recently came across this lovely poem whilst watching the (excellent) TV show Rake The song will have it That those that we have loved got their long fingers From death, and wounds, or on Sinai's ...
James's user avatar
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9 votes
6 answers
8k views

What does "ceremony of innocence" mean In "The Second Coming"?

The Second Coming by W.B. Yeats: Turning and turning in the widening gyre The falcon cannot hear the falconer; Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world, The ...
user7982's user avatar
4 votes
4 answers
12k views

Who is the falcon, and who the falconer?

In Yeats' greatest of poems, he writes that "the falcon cannot hear the falconer." Who is the falcon and who is the falconer? Why might Yeats have chosen this metaphor? The Second Coming ...
DukeZhou's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
181 views

When did Yeats enter into "Virgil's territory"?

In the definition of "divagate," several dictionaries, like this one, give the following example sentence: Yeats divagated into Virgil's territory only once. What instance of Yeats' writing does ...
Doubt's user avatar
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6 votes
3 answers
1k views

What does "pull down the blinds" mean in Yeats's poem "The Mountain Tomb"?

Pour wine and dance, if manhood still have pride, Bring roses, if the rose be yet in bloom; The cataract smokes on the mountain side. Our Father Rosicross is in his tomb. Pull down ...
calm-tedesco's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
756 views

Why could Cú Chulainn not recognise his own son?

I was reading WB Yeats play On Baile's Strand in which the protagonist Cú Chulainn kills a young man whom he later recognizes as his son. How did he not recognize him earlier? Fintain, a character in ...
Arkady's user avatar
  • 133
14 votes
1 answer
818 views

What does "kettle at the heel" mean in this Yeats poem, "The Tower"?

What shall I do with this absurdity — O heart, O troubled heart — this caricature, Decrepit age that has been tied to me As to a dog's tail? Never had I more Excited, passionate, fantastical ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 659
17 votes
5 answers
26k views

What rough beast slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?

Turning and turning in the widening gyreThe falcon cannot hear the falconer; Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world, The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and ...
DukeZhou's user avatar
  • 4,273
9 votes
1 answer
804 views

How much of The Song of Wandering Aengus by Yeats is based on Irish folklore?

Yeats was a keen student of Irish folklore and it is clear that the titular character in his poem The Song of Wandering Aengus is based on the pre-Christian Celtic god of love, youth and poetry. ...
Matt Thrower's user avatar
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17 votes
1 answer
2k views

How does the golden bough in "Sailing to Byzantium" relate to the story in the Aeneid, if at all?

According to Wikipedia of W.B. Yeats' "Sailing to Byzantium" is a metaphor for a spiritual journey. Yeats explores his thoughts and musings on how immortality, art, and the human spirit may ...
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