Questions tagged [william-blake]

Questions about the pre-Romantic English poet, painter and printmaker William Blake (1757 – 1827) and his works. Blake is known for combining poems with illustrations. His works include 'Songs of Innocence', 'Songs of Experience', 'The Marriage of Heaven and Hell' and 'Milton'. In addition to his own works, he also illustrated other books, such as Dante's 'Divine Comedy' and the Bible.

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12
votes
1answer
6k views

How many of the Songs of Innocence and of Experience come in pairs?

Some years ago I studied many of Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience. Many of them are very clearly paired up, an Innocence song and an Experience song deliberately written to compare and ...
12
votes
3answers
7k views

What are the "dark Satanic mills" in Blake's Jerusalem?

The short poem Jerusalem by William Blake - not to be confused with his much longer epic poem of the same title; I'm talking about the "did those feet in ancient times" one - contains the following ...
8
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1answer
402 views

Are Songs of Experience and Songs of Innocence actually songs? Or is the word song a metaphor?

William Blake's Songs of Experience and Songs of Innocence have the word "song" in their title. Why is that? Are they actually songs? Or is the word "song" a metaphor for something else.
7
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1answer
729 views

Why is the robin "sobbing"?

Blake's "The Blossom", part of his Songs of Innocence which you can read online, is a very short poem about a sparrow and a robin. The part about the robin reads as follows: Pretty, pretty robin! ...
8
votes
3answers
6k views

What are the "mind-forged manacles"?

From "London", a short poem in William Blake's Songs of Experience collection (free to read online): In every cry of every man, In every infant’s cry of fear, In every voice, in every ban, ...
11
votes
1answer
18k views

Why did the stars throw down their spears?

William Blake's poem “The Tyger” from Songs of Experience contains one couplet whose meaning has always puzzled me, lines 17–18, the first two lines of the fifth stanza: When the stars threw ...
6
votes
0answers
792 views

Is the comparison in "The Clod and the Pebble" between different types of love?

The poem "The Clod and the Pebble" from William Blake's Songs of Innocence and Experience (which you can read online) is just three verses long and compares two different descriptions of love, ...
13
votes
2answers
6k views

What is the deeper meaning of "The Tyger"?

William Blake's poem "The Tyger" is part of his collection Songs of Innocence and of Experience, an extraordinary set of poems which explores ideas such as spirituality, love, poverty, repression, all ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

Why is "The Chimney Sweeper" in Songs of Innocence rather than Songs of Experience?

The Chimney Sweeper from Songs of Innocence opens like this: When my mother died I was very young, And my father sold me while yet my tongue Could scarcely cry 'weep! 'weep! 'weep! 'weep! So ...
6
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0answers
104 views

When and how was the phrase "these dark Satanic mills" in Blake's "Jerusalem" first altered to "those dark Satanic mills"?

William Blake's lines of verse "Jerusalem", which appear in the "Preface" to his poem "Milton", were written c.1804 and first printed c.1808. They also appear, but with ...
2
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0answers
46 views

Which version of William Blake's "Jerusalem" did John Reith recite to celebrate the end of the General Strike?

In his 1PM radio broadcast on 12 May 1926, John Reith, managing director of the BBC, recited William Blake's "And did those feet in ancient time" (also known as "Jerusalem") [1] to ...