Questions tagged [samuel-taylor-coleridge]

Questions about the works of the English romantic poet and literary critic Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 – 1834) and his life as a writer. He is best known for the poems 'The Rime of the Ancient Mariner' and 'Kubla Khan', and the poetry collection 'Lyrical Ballads', which he co-authored with William Wordsworth.

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Why “all should cry, Beware! Beware!” in Coleridge's “Kubla Khan”?

Samuel Taylor Coleridge's incomplete poem "Kubla Khan" ends with a vision of a poet in an ecstatic state with "flashing eyes" and "floating hair". He is beyond the realm of mere mortals for he has ...
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What's the meaning of “my censures” as in Coleridge's “Biographia Literaria”

In Chapter Four: This fact of itself would have made me diffident in my censures, had not a still stronger ground been furnished by the strange contrast of the heat and long continuance of the ...
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What is “the well known story of the picture” in Coleridge's “Biographia Literaria”?

From Chapter 4 of Biographia Literaria by Samuel Taylor Coleridge: I am indeed convinced in my own mind, that could the same experiment have been tried with these volumes, as was made in the well ...
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What does “the cause” refer to in Coleridge's “Biographia Literaria”?

From Chapter 4 of Biographia Literaria by Samuel Taylor Coleridge: At present it will be sufficient for my purpose, if I have proved, that Mr. Southey’s writings no more than my own furnished the ...
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What's the meaning of “preceding” as in Coleridge's Biographia Literaria

From Chapter 13 in Coleridge's Biographia Literaria (italics added): I could add to these arguments one derived from pecuniary motives, and particularly from the probable effects on the sale of ...
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111 views

What were the original titles/structure in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner?

Coleridge's famous poem "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" has its constituent parts titled differently in different editions / online sources. For example: Lit2Go has "Part the First", "Part the ...
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Meaning of “all the boards did shrink” in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

From The Rime of the Ancient Mariner: Water, water, every where, And all the boards did shrink; Water, water, every where, Nor any drop to drink. What is the meaning of this phrase in ...
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Why isn't Coleridge's line about trochees missing an unstressed syllable?

Samuel Coleridge wrote this really fun poem, Metrical Feet: Lesson for a Boy, that names and gives examples of the various types of metric feet. I've included a copy and scanned the poem to make the ...
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644 views

Catalectic trochaic tetrameter or acephaleous iambic tetrameter? Scanning “Kubla Khan”

I'm currently teaching myself to scan, and I'm practicing with Coleridge's "Kubla Khan" at the moment. You can read the entire poem online. I've arrived at line 32: "Floated midway on the waves;" and ...
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Why did Samuel Coleridge metaphorise 'work without hope ' as 'nectar in a sieve'?

Source: An Explication of "Work Without Hope", by Amy Edwards, ’02 West Chester University The last two lines of this poem are the turning point, and make it all come together. Coleridge writes, "...
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Is the mariner immortal?

I pass, like night, from land to land; I have strange power of speech; That moment that his face I see, I know the man that must hear me: To him my tale I teach. This is one of the last ...
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Who chained the albatross to the mariner's neck?

In the long poem by Samuel Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, the mariner talks about an albatross being chained to his neck: Instead of the cross, the albatross About my neck was hung. ...