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Questions tagged [nalo-hopkinson]

Questions about the Jamaican-born Canadian writer Nalo Hopkinson (born 1960) and her work. She has published novels such as 'Brown Girl in the Ring' (1998), 'Midnight Robber' (2002) and 'The Salt Roads' (2003), and collections of short stories such as 'Skin Folk' (2001).

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What are Trubies?

Nalo Hopkinson's short story "Ours is the Prettiest" (published in the collection Falling in Love with Hominids, 2015) mentions Trubies several times, for example: Page 190: I swung aside the ...
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Relevance of tiger limerick to Gilla's story

In the short story "The Smile on the Face" by Nalo Hopkinson (published in the collection Falling in Love with Hominids, 2015), the author intersperses the story with fragments and lines from the ...
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Why does Tan-Tan name her child Tubman?

At the end of Nalo Hopkinson's novel Midnight Robber (2000), Tan-Tan, the main character, gives birth to a boy. Her friend Melonhead asks how she will name him: "Tubman." Tan-Tan surprised herself, ...
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How do people “kiss their teeth” in Nalo Hopkinson's novels?

At the start of the novel Sister Mine by Nalo Hopkinson, one of the characters, Makeda, is looking for a new place to live. A certain Milo rents out "units" in what he calls "warehouse living" and ...
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Relevance of the cloud chariot story to the rest of Midnight Robber?

Nalo Hopkinson's novel Midnight Robber contains a story entitled "How Tan-Tan Learn to Thief". It is one of the many elements from Caribbean culture that Hopkinson draws on in the novel. The story is ...
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Origin of Dry Bone in Nalo Hopkinson's Midnight Robber

Nalo Hopkinson's novel Midnight Robber contains a story entitled "Tan-Tan and Dry Bone". It is one of the many elements from Caribbean culture that Hopkinson draws on in the novel. Hopkinson's novel ...
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Has Nalo Hopkinson had pets which influenced her writing?

In at least two of Nalo Hopkinson's short stories that I've read, the main characters are women with an interest in ... unusual creatures. Namely, "Can't Beat 'Em" (Marisella keeps a 'glup', a sort of ...
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Relevance of Findlay's poem 'Stolen' to Hopkinson's novel Midnight Robber

Nalo Hopkinson's novel Midnight Robber (published in 2000) is prefaced by the poem "Stolen" by David Findlay. According to the novel's colophon, the poem's copyright is dated 1997. However, according ...
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What's with the reference to “Alice in Wonderland” in Nalo Hopkinson's “The Reverse Cheshire Cat”?

Nalo Hopkinson's "The Reverse Cheshire Cat" is obviously making a reference to Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, with the Cheshire Cat. The two protagonists enter a shop named "The Reverse Cheshire ...
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What's the significance of the name Loyola?

As soon as I started reading Nalo Hopkinson's short story "The Reverse Cheshire Cat" (freely available to read online), the name "Loyola" jumped out at me. Surely this must be a reference to Ignatius ...
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Meaning of the /ʌ/ sounds in Nalo Hopkinson's story Can’t Beat ‘Em

In Nalo Hopkinson's short story Can’t Beat ‘Em, people try to deal with a sort of "sink throat monster" that one of the characters calls "glups". While reading the story a second time, I gained the ...
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What does the last line of Nalo Hopkinson's “Shift” mean?

I've finished reading Nalo Hopkinson's short story "Shift", and I'm baffled by the ending. After the protagonist's encounter with his family, and his girlfriend tells him to find out who he is, the ...
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When is “fe” used in Nalo Hopkinson's “Shift”?

The word "fe" is used three times in the Nalo Hopkinson short story "Shift": When my mother who wasn’t my mother yet approach the man who wasn’t my father yet, when she ask him, “Man, you eat salt, ...
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What is the relevance of the title of Nalo Hopkinson's “A Raggy Dog, a Shaggy Dog”?

I've just read Nalo Hopkinson's short story "A Raggy Dog, a Shaggy Dog" (available for free online from Apex Magazine). It's an odd, quirky tale about an orchid-loving lady who's constantly setting ...
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What does “nuh” mean here in “Shift” by Nalo Hopkinson?

In reading "Shift" by Nalo Hopkinson, I came across this paragraph: In my mother and father, salt meet with sweet. Milk meet with chocolate. No one could touch her while he was alive and ruler of ...
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Significance of 'There was a time they called porridge “gruel.”'

In Nalo Hopkinson's short story Shift, Caliban has a relationship with a "golden girl". At some point, Caliban mentions she is cooking oats. At an earlier point in the story he says There was a ...
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Why is the colour of Caliban's girls important?

I recently read Nalo Hopkinson's short story "Shift", which is freely available online. The central character is a reimagining of Shakespeare's Caliban, a Caribbean black man who finds white women to ...
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Why are pronouns used in this way in Nalo Hopkinson's “Shift”?

I just read the short story "Shift" by Nalo Hopkinson, which is freely available online. It's a modern, Caribbean-themed story inspired by Shakespeare's The Tempest. One thing which confused me on ...