Questions tagged [literary-device]

For questions regarding an author's use of various literary techniques and other stylistic elements to allow the reader to better interpret and appreciate the work of literature.

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Why does isolating "there" on its own line sound less emphatic in Korean than English?

I was reading Translator’s Note: Three Poems by Ko Un from the Poetry Foundation and came across this excerpt: We translated “명사도 동사도 다” (“all nouns and verbs”) as “all words,” which sounds less ...
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Is there a word for a literary technique that allows a short passage to be read aloud in more than one way?

I recently started reading Sam Logan's Sam and Fuzzy online, and am greatly enjoying it. In the fifth volume of the NMS Series (Sam and Fuzzy Missing Inaction, "Boundaries, Pt. 9") there's a cute ...
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86 views

What is the point of "the story so far"/recaps in book series?

I just finished the book "The Fellowship of the Ring". Now I've started with "The Two Towers". It begins by recapping the story of the first book. For who exactly is this "...
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Are the terms "metatextuality / metareference / metareferentiality" synonyms? Is the following definition correct?

Questions I would like to know if I understood correctly that "metatextuality / metareference / metareferentiality" are synonyms and can be used interchangeably. Finally I summarize what I ...
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61 views

Forms of foregrounding: are recurrence / equivalence the same?

I'm struggling to grasp the difference between the literary devices of recurrence and equivalence. I'm preparing for an exam where we are asked to define these terms. In German, they are referred to ...
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80 views

Are these lines from "Dulce et decorum est" an example of dehumanisation?

This: And watch the white eyes writhing in his face, His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin; Is a quote from British WW1 soldier-poet Wilfred Owen’s “Dulce et Decorum Est”. I was wondering if ...
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91 views

Can "women echoed" be considered a figure of speech?

I'm trying to understand the use of literary devices, and in particular the literary conventions related to metonymy, metaphor and similar figures of speech. For example, in the following sentence, ...