Skip to main content

Questions tagged [john-keats]

Questions about the works of the English Romantic poet John Keats (1795 – 1821) and his life as a writer.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
16 votes
1 answer
2k views

Was Dan Simmons' Hyperion Cantos based on the story beats of the same Keats poems?

I've read Dan Simmons' Hyperion Cantos, composed of the books Hyperion, Fall of Hyperion, Endymion, and Rise of Endymion. The series pays considerable homage to the life and works of the 1800s poet ...
doppelgreener's user avatar
15 votes
1 answer
628 views

Had Keats read any of Homer's works before reading Chapman's translation of them?

In "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer," John Keats writes: Oft of one wide expanse had I been told That deep-browed Homer ruled as his demesne; Yet never did I breathe its pure serene ...
Kevin Troy's user avatar
  • 2,120
11 votes
2 answers
901 views

Meaning of this line in "On seeing the Elgin Marbles"

And each imagined pinnacle and steep Of godlike hardship tells me I must die The "pinnacle and steep" represent the pillars of the Parthenon if I'm not mistaken. But the next line doesn't ...
Airdish's user avatar
  • 831
9 votes
1 answer
4k views

What is the meaning of "To Autumn"?

Many poems are filled with metaphors and underlying ideas about deeper things and more broad issues or feelings. I personally feel that "To Marguerite" is an example of this, where the poem is ...
Airdish's user avatar
  • 831
9 votes
1 answer
777 views

Do the poisons in "Ode on Melancholy" have deeper meaning?

In "Ode on Melancholy", Keats uses the images of three poisons in the first stanza: Wolf's bane, nightshade, and yew-berries. Are these poisons simply meant to connote death/suicide, or might they ...
Airdish's user avatar
  • 831
9 votes
3 answers
760 views

Why is "Ode on Melancholy" an Ode?

What features of Keats's "Ode on Melancholy" make it an ode? This is a question that seems to be important in our English class, yet I don't have a comprehensive answer. Merriam-Webster defines "ode" ...
Airdish's user avatar
  • 831
9 votes
2 answers
2k views

What are the "lovely tales" in Keats' "Endymion"?

What is Keats saying in the last three lines here? And such too is the grandeur of the dooms We have imagined for the mighty dead; All lovely tales that we have heard or read: An endless ...
A. Goodier's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
435 views

How does ignorance make a barren waste in "To the Nile" by John Keats?

The sonnet "To the Nile" (1818) by John Keats reads as follows: Son of the old Moon-mountains African!     Chief of the Pyramid and Crocodile!     We call thee fruitful, and that very while ...
Selfie- grofie's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
351 views

Is Keats' swan with "neck of arched snow" an allusion to Milton's "swan with arched neck"?

I discovered something quite interesting today in John Milton's Paradise Lost. Here is Milton (this is the Archangel Raphael relating to Adam and Eve the creation of the world):                       ...
Solomon's user avatar
  • 99
8 votes
2 answers
734 views

What was the connection between Hardy and Keats?

Thomas Hardy's short poem "At Lulworth Cove a Century Back" is a sort of ode to Keats, who apparently left England from near Lulworth Cove on his way to Rome: "Good. That man goes to Rome — to ...
Rand al'Thor's user avatar
  • 74.1k
8 votes
1 answer
1k views

Are Endymion and Hyperion by John Keats intended to be related pieces?

Hyperion and Endymion are poems by the famous poet John Keats, both based on Greek mythology. Hyperion talks about the Titan's despairing after their defeat by the Olympians, and was written in 1818-...
user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
2k views

Meaning of "shade to shade" in Keats' "Ode on Melancholy"

In "Ode on Melancholy," Keats writes For shade to shade will come too drowsily, And drown the wakeful anguish of the soul What is meant by "shade to shade will come too drowsily"?
Airdish's user avatar
  • 831
7 votes
2 answers
786 views

Explain the grammar of "That not one fleecy lamb ..." in Keats' "Endymion"

I have a question regarding the meaning of a stanza from Keats' Endymion: Among the shepherds, ’twas believed ever, That not one fleecy lamb which thus did sever From the white flock, but pass’d ...
balteo's user avatar
  • 1,003
7 votes
3 answers
651 views

Alternate meaning of "still" in 'Ode to a Nightingale'

This resource on 'Ode to a Nightingale' by Keats says that the word "still" in stanza 6 ("Still wouldst thou sing") might have more than one meaning. However, I can't see it meaning anything beyond '...
Airdish's user avatar
  • 831
7 votes
2 answers
402 views

Why is the 1820 Indicator version of La Belle Dame Sans Merci seen as more "politically correct"?

In his textbook Theory of Literature, Paul Fry writes at length about Jerome McGann's critique of Keats. As part of this he has this to say about the comparison between the 1819/1848 and the 1820 ...
Matt Thrower's user avatar
  • 23.1k
7 votes
1 answer
260 views

"Though Fancy's casket were unlock'd to choose" in John Keats's "Lamia"

I am trying to understand the meaning to the following excerpt from John Keats's Lamia (full poem here), and especially the fourth line below: Fast by the springs where she to bathe was wont, And in ...
balteo's user avatar
  • 1,003
6 votes
1 answer
483 views

Why was John Keats called a poet “who was kill’d off by one critique”?

In Canto XI of Lord Byron’s magnificent work Don Juan, romantic poet Keats is mentioned as a poet who was kill’d off by one critique. Why he was referred to like that? And which critique was it?
Knight wants Loong back's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
436 views

Where did Wordsworth describe Keats's poetry as "very pretty paganism"?

While researching a question about one of Wordsworth's sonnets, I came across the article In the Ruins of Babylon: The Poetic “Genius” of John Keats by Paul Krause, which contains the following ...
Tsundoku's user avatar
  • 47.3k
4 votes
1 answer
2k views

On what occasion did Shelley say "Keats was a Greek"?

Once Shelley said, "Keats was a Greek." What was the context? Whom did he say this to?
Akshat Shukla's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
172 views

"More beautiful than ever twisted braid..." in John Keats's "Lamia"

I am trying to understand the meaning to the following couplets from John Keats's Lamia (full poem here): Ah, happy Lycius!—for she was a maid More beautiful than ever twisted braid, Or sigh'd, or ...
balteo's user avatar
  • 1,003
4 votes
1 answer
86 views

Has "To Autumn" ever ended the first stanza with something other than a period?

Is there an edition of Keats' poem To Autumn which ends the first stanza with something other than a period (full stop)? Do we have an edition of it that Keats saw through the press? I think the ...
John Harvey's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
516 views

Why is wolf's bane "tight-rooted" in Keats' "Ode on Melancholy"?

In Keats's 'Ode on Melancholy', he writes neither twist Wolf's-bane, tight-rooted, for its poisonous wine; Why did Keats choose to describe Wolf's-bane as "tight-rooted"?
Airdish's user avatar
  • 831
3 votes
1 answer
107 views

Where did Keats write “wrinkled brow and sneer of cold command”?

Face to Face with Hon. Henry Litton GBM CBM JP, Former Permanent Judge of the Court of Final Appeal | Hong Kong Lawyer A good judge is also humble – they “see the world as the common man and woman ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
228 views

Meaning of the noun 'sweet' in Keats' "Endymion"

I am unsure about the meaning of sweet when used as a noun in John Keats' Endymion. Here are some examples uses of the word: Verse 224: Thus ending, on the shrine he heap’d a spire Of teeming sweets, ...
balteo's user avatar
  • 1,003
3 votes
1 answer
138 views

"Shut, shut those juggling eyes, thou ruthless man!" in John Keats's "Lamia"

I am trying to understand the meaning of the following passage from John Keats's Lamia (full poem here): "Shut, shut those juggling eyes, thou ruthless man! Turn them aside, wretch! or the ...
balteo's user avatar
  • 1,003
3 votes
1 answer
52 views

"Leave thee alone! Look back! Ah, Goddess, see" in John Keats's "Lamia"

I am trying to understand the meaning to the following excerpt from John Keats's Lamia (full poem here): "Leave thee alone! Look back! Ah, Goddess, see Whether my eyes can ever turn from thee! ...
balteo's user avatar
  • 1,003
3 votes
1 answer
241 views

Keats' views on beauty

In the poem Endymion: A poetic romance (1818), the first stanza of Book I (beginning, "A thing of beauty is a joy for ever") focuses a great deal on beauty where Keats presents some of his views on ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

Are "simple sheep" a biblical reference in Keats' "Endymion"?

In the poem Endymion: A poetic romance (1818), the first stanza of Book I (beginning, "A thing of beauty is a joy for ever") contains the following passage:-                                       ...
user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
481 views

Difficulty understanding the meaning of the word "attitude" in Keats's "Ode on a Grecian Urn"

O Attic shape! Fair attitude! with brede Of marble men and maidens overwrought I am having trouble understanding Keats's use of the word "attitude" in these lines, and the explanation given ...
Thomas's user avatar
  • 173
2 votes
1 answer
159 views

"Will make Elysian shades not too fair, too divine." in John Keats's "Lamia"

I am trying to understand the meaning of a verse from John Keats's Lamia (full poem here): [...] Now, when the wine has done its rosy deed, And every soul from human trammels freed, No more so ...
balteo's user avatar
  • 1,003
2 votes
1 answer
69 views

"His phantasy was lost, where reason fades,..." in John Keats's "Lamia"

I am trying to understand the meaning to the following excerpt from John Keats's Lamia (full poem here): Thoughtless at first, but ere eve's star appeared His phantasy was lost, where reason fades, ...
balteo's user avatar
  • 1,003
2 votes
0 answers
35 views

Is there any deep connection between Hyperion (the sci-fi novel) and Hyperion (the poem)? [duplicate]

Hyperion is a sci-fi classic by Dan Simmons which takes its name from the poem by John Keats of the same name. The novel makes multiple references to the poem by Keats and actually Keats is even a ...
Lorenzo Pozzi's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
154 views

What did Keats mean by “it is not without a feeling of regret that I make it public” in his preface to "Endymion"?

John Keats, in the Preface to Endymion, wrote: Knowing within myself the manner in which this poem has been produced, it is not without a feeling of regret that I make it public. Why did he express ...
Knight wants Loong back's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
2k views

Who is the “close bosom-friend of the maturing sun”?

John Keats, in his ode "To Autumn", writes Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun. Who is the close bosom-friend of the maturing sun?
Knight wants Loong back's user avatar