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Questions tagged [john-keats]

Questions about the works of the English Romantic poet John Keats (1795 – 1821) and his life as a writer.

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5
votes
1answer
188 views

What was the connection between Hardy and Keats?

Thomas Hardy's short poem "At Lulworth Cove a Century Back" is a sort of ode to Keats, who apparently left England from near Lulworth Cove on his way to Rome: "Good. That man goes to Rome — to ...
7
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0answers
50 views

'Endymion' - Keats

And such too is the grandeur of the dooms We have imagined for the mighty dead; All lovely tales that we have heard or read: An endless fountain of immortal drink, Pouring unto us from the ...
4
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1answer
465 views

On what occasion did Shelley say “Keats was a Greek”?

Once Shelley said, "Keats was a Greek." What was the context? Whom did he say this to?
7
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1answer
465 views

Meaning of “shade to shade”

In "Ode on Melancholy," Keats writes For shade to shade will come too drowsily, And drown the wakeful anguish of the soul What is meant by "shade to shade will come too drowsily"?
9
votes
3answers
616 views

Why is “Ode on Melancholy” an Ode?

What features of Keats's "Ode on Melancholy" make it an ode? This is a question that seems to be important in our English class, yet I don't have a comprehensive answer. Merriam-Webster defines "ode" ...
7
votes
1answer
217 views

Do the poisons in “Ode on Melancholy” have deeper meaning?

In "Ode on Melancholy", Keats uses the images of three poisons in the first stanza: Wolf's bane, nightshade, and yew-berries. Are these poisons simply meant to connote death/suicide, or might they ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Why is this adjective given in Ode on Melancholy

In Keats's Ode on Melancholy, he writes neither twist Wolf's bane, tight-rooted, for its poisonous wine; Why is Wolf's bane described as "tight-rooted"?
7
votes
3answers
549 views

Alternate meaning of “still” in 'Ode to a Nightingale'

This resource on 'Ode to a Nightingale' by Keats says that the word "still" in stanza 6 ("Still wouldst thou sing") might have more than one meaning. However, I can't see it meaning anything beyond '...
10
votes
2answers
518 views

Meaning of this line in “On seeing the Elgin Marbles”

And each imagined pinnacle and steep Of godlike hardship tells me I must die The "pinnacle and steep" represent the pillars of the Parthenon if I'm not mistaken. But the next line doesn't make ...
7
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1answer
2k views

What is the meaning of “To Autumn”?

Many poems are filled with metaphors and underlying ideas about deeper things and more broad issues or feelings. I personally feel that "To Marguerite" is an example of this, where the poem is ...
6
votes
1answer
537 views

Are Endymion and Hyperion by John Keats intended to be related pieces?

Hyperion and Endymion are poems by the famous poet John Keats, both based on Greek mythology. Hyperion talks about the Titan's despairing after their defeat by the Olympians, and was written in 1818-...
13
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1answer
931 views

Was Dan Simmons' Hyperion Cantos based on the story beats of the same Keats poems?

I've read Dan Simmons' Hyperion Cantos, composed of the books Hyperion, Fall of Hyperion, Endymion, and Rise of Endymion. The series pays considerable homage to the life and works of the 1800s poet ...
12
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1answer
246 views

Had Keats read any of Homer's works before reading Chapman's translation of them?

In "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer," John Keats writes: Oft of one wide expanse had I been told That deep-browed Homer ruled as his demesne; Yet never did I breathe its pure serene ...