Questions tagged [finnegans-wake]

Questions about James Joyce's final novel Finnegans Wake (1939). Use with the [james-joyce] tag.

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In Finnegans Wake, is Shem dead tonight?

Is Shem dead tonight? I was alerted to this possibility, non-authoritatively, by Porter Girl, whose name provides further "proof" that Joyce wrote all his significant future readers into ...
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In chapter I.5 of Finnegans Wake, how are the “paper wounds” ordered?

In chapter I.5 [page 124 line 3] of Finnegans Wake by James Joyce, the "Stop. Please stop. Do please stop. O do please stop" motif is associated with four punctuation marks. These paper ...
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Did Joyce “estimate” how many readers would understand Finnegans Wake?

I'm pretty sure I once (a long time ago) read a Joyce quote where he said that only twelve (or was it thirteen?) readers would ever fully understand Finnegans Wake. But I couldn't convince Google to ...
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Meaning of “bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthur-nuk!”

From Finnegans Wake, What is the meaning of this word? In context: The fall (bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthur- nuk!) of a once ...
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In Finnegans Wake, what could “enos chalked halltraps” refer to?

In Finnegans Wake, what could the phrase "enos chalked halltraps" refer to? Some, possibly flawed, attempt at pest control? [30.1] Now (to forebare for ever solittle of Iris Trees and Lili ...
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215 views

Does Joyce, in Finnegans Wake or Ulysses, link the sound form “hoe” to “whore”?

Does Joyce, in Finnegans Wake or Ulysses, link the sound form "hoe" to "whore", as in the current day "ho"? For example, is it probable that Joyce intended the (additional) modern day pun in the ...
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95 views

Does “egourge” in Finnegans Wake derive from the Greek “egoourgos” meaning “worker for the self”?

Finnwake.com claims that "egourge", in the following line from Finnegans Wake (p.g. 49-50), derives from "egoourgos (gr) - worker for the self", but Google Translate does not seem to know of any word "...
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224 views

Who wrote the well-known Outline of Chapter Contents in the Penguin edition of Finnegans Wake?

Who wrote the well-known Outline of Chapter Contents in the Penguin edition of Finnegans Wake? Wikipedia describes the structure of Finnegans Wake as follows. Finnegans Wake comprises seventeen ...
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Joyce, Nora Barnacle and Papishee

On page 75 of A Reader's Guide to Finnegan Wake, in analysis of the line "to league his lot, palm and patte, with a papishee [62.9]", Tindall links "papishee" with both ALP and Nora, but without any ...
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In Finnegans Wake, surely these two characters are different, and one is dead?

Since the motivation and argument supporting my question is long, but the question itself is fairly short, I will state the question as a spoiler. If the answer turns out to be indeed yes, then it ...
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In Finnegans Wake, surely the dreamer is this character?

As I see it, Finnegans Wake has two main sections, namely Section A (“dreamland” [1-617.29]) and Section B (“anna’s interior monologue” [617.30-628]). Section A and Section B are my terms and there is ...
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495 views

What does Nuvoletta's disappearance signify in Finnegans Wake?

I am studying Samuel Barber's art song "Nuvoletta", whose text is adapted from James Joyce's Finnegans Wake. I have not studied Finnegans Wake. The music is very beautiful. As I understand it, ...
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What languages should one know to appreciate Finnegans Wake?

I have heard it said that Finnegans Wake is a great work, and my impression is that every sentence has one or two words being a pun of an English word and at least one valid word of another language. ...