Questions tagged [endymion]

Questions about "Endymion" (1818), a poem by John Keats. Use with [john-keats] and [poetry].

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7 votes
2 answers
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Explain the grammar of "That not one fleecy lamb ..." in Keats' "Endymion"

I have a question regarding the meaning of a stanza from Keats' Endymion: Among the shepherds, ’twas believed ever, That not one fleecy lamb which thus did sever From the white flock, but pass’d ...
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  • 549
7 votes
2 answers
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What are the "lovely tales" in Keats' "Endymion"?

What is Keats saying in the last three lines here? And such too is the grandeur of the dooms We have imagined for the mighty dead; All lovely tales that we have heard or read: An endless ...
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3 votes
1 answer
172 views

Meaning of the noun 'sweet' in Keats' "Endymion"

I am unsure about the meaning of sweet when used as a noun in John Keats' Endymion. Here are some examples uses of the word: Verse 224: Thus ending, on the shrine he heap’d a spire Of teeming sweets, ...
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3 votes
1 answer
956 views

Are "simple sheep" a biblical reference in Keats' "Endymion"?

In the poem Endymion: A poetic romance (1818), the first stanza of Book I (beginning, "A thing of beauty is a joy for ever") contains the following passage:-                                       ...
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2 votes
1 answer
126 views

Keats' views on beauty

In the poem Endymion: A poetic romance (1818), the first stanza of Book I (beginning, "A thing of beauty is a joy for ever") focuses a great deal on beauty where Keats presents some of his views on ...
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1 vote
1 answer
87 views

What did Keats mean by “it is not without a feeling of regret that I make it public” in his preface to "Endymion"?

John Keats, in the Preface to Endymion, wrote: Knowing within myself the manner in which this poem has been produced, it is not without a feeling of regret that I make it public. Why did he express ...
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