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In "The Da Vinci Code" by Dan Brown (2003), was the albinism of Silas significant to the story line, or was its purpose only to make Silas more distinct?

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    I think this question would be more effective if you explained why you think the albinism might be considered significant. That is, make your case for this question being a non-trivial one. Otherwise, you can make a question "Is minor detail X significant" about pretty much any detail in any book, and the answer is usually "Eh, not really." – Standback Jan 29 '17 at 7:20
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Silas' abusive father would often ridicule him for his appearance. It's been a while since I read the book, but if memory serves his father would often call him "ghost". This put further strain on their relationship, a relationship that ended very early, with a young Silas murdering his father.

You may say, therefore, that the albinism of Silas played a role in shaping his life from very early on, but I do not think it is otherwise significant to the story.

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Well, I think that his Albinism was a major point of the plot. As Yannis mentioned, the strain on his and his father's relationship led to him murdering his father. Not only that, but it is the only reason Silas was not the best weapon. If you can work only at night, then that limits your opportunities very much. And if he wanted to take the keystone from Saint-Sulpice, he could have gone in on one of the off days. His coming at night gave Sister Sandrine enough shock and suspicion to call the Senechaux. And if he hadn't come to the Chetau Ville at night, Landon and co would have been out the next day, someplace or other. This would kill the plot.

  • I'd be very surprised if there was no some deeper allusion. The book itself seemed very well researched and was incredibly playful. – DukeZhou Mar 22 '17 at 14:43

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