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The poems (to use the word loosely) of the Irish writer and lawyer Edward Kenealy contain this alleged translation from the Bengali:

Song in the Metre of the Original

A maid there is more bright than light
   Whose charms my soul inflame ;
Her father's only child she is,
   And Veedya is her name.
In vain my lyre, that form, all fire
   And beauty, would portray ;
But, oh ! my heart is sad and lone,
   While she is far away.

They say that Love has ne'er revealed
   His form to mortal eye ;
But he who views my Veedya's charms,
   Sees Cama's self stand by.
Ye gods, forbid that he should see
   That maid so choice, so fair ;
For Love may then my rival prove,
   And sink me to despair.

I'll chant in song her matchless grace,
   And breathe it in her ear ;
The sacred hymns of Noodyia
   My Veedya oft shall hear.
How blest were I, if, changed by spells
   Into a bird-like shape,
I sang to her in Vrindabor,
   'Mid lily, rose, and grape.

My Veedya's beauty fills my soul ;
   I murmur still her name ;
She brightens every hope and thought,
   And is my being's aim.
At night, at dawn, in star and sun
   I see her ever shine ;
My life must be one cheerless waste,
   Till Veedya's heart be mine.

Kenealy, Edward Vaughn. "From the Bengali: Song in the Metre of the Original." Poems and Translations. London: Reeves and Turner, 1864. pp. 455–456. Accessed at archive.org 7 April 2024.

This is of course marvelous fun, particularly when sung to the tune of There was a farmer had a dog; one can substitute V-E-E-D-Y-A for B-I-N-G-O without breaking meter. That said, it purports to be a translation, but Kenealy provides no information about what the original might be. Is this really a translation, or just Orientalist guff like Lalla Rookh? If the former, what is the Bengali original?

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